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North American T-28 Trojan


Two-Seat Basic Trainer Aircraft


United States | 1949



"Despite its trainer origins, the single-engine twin-seat North American T-28 Trojan was successfully used as a combat platform for a time."

Power & Performance
Those special qualities that separate one aircraft design from another. Performance specifications presented assume optimal operating conditions for the North American T-28D Trojan Two-Seat Basic Trainer Aircraft.
1 x Wright R-1820-86 "Cyclone" air-cooled radial piston engine developing 1,425 horsepower driving two- or three-bladed propeller unit at the nose.
Propulsion
343 mph
552 kph | 298 kts
Max Speed
35,499 ft
10,820 m | 7 miles
Service Ceiling
1,059 miles
1,705 km | 921 nm
Operational Range
4,000 ft/min
1,219 m/min
Rate-of-Climb
Structure
The nose-to-tail, wingtip-to-wingtip physical qualities of the North American T-28D Trojan Two-Seat Basic Trainer Aircraft.
2
(MANNED)
Crew
33.0 ft
10.06 m
O/A Length
40.1 ft
(12.22 m)
O/A Width
12.7 ft
(3.86 m)
O/A Height
6,424 lb
(2,914 kg)
Empty Weight
8,501 lb
(3,856 kg)
MTOW
Armament
Available supported armament and special-mission equipment featured in the design of the North American T-28 Trojan Two-Seat Basic Trainer Aircraft .
OPTIONAL:
Conventional bombs, rockets, machine gun pods (7.62mm or 12.7mm calibers), 20mm cannon pods or napalm as required across two or six underwing pylons.
Variants
Notable series variants as part of the North American T-28 Trojan family line.
XT-28 - Prototype; 2 examples produced.
T-28A - USAF Trainer; fitted with Wright R-1300-7 radial piston engine of 800 horsepower; 1,194 examples produced.
T-28B - US Navy Trainer; fitted with Wright R-1820-9 radial piston engine of 1,425 horsepower; 489 examples produced.
T-28C - US Navy Trainer; based on T-28B production models; smaller radius propeller blade; tailhook implemented for carrier landings; 266 examples produced.
T-28D "Nomad" - T-28A production models converted to counter-insurgency role; fitting engines of the B- and C-models; six underwing hardpoints for external store; 393 A-models converted as such.
AT-28D - USAF attack trainer variant.
Fennec - USAF T-28A conversion models for France; conversion handled by Sud-Aviation.
T-28R-1 "Nomair" - USAF T-28 conversion models for Brazilian Navy.
T-28R-2 "Nomair" - USAF T-28 conversion models for civilian use.
Nomad Mark I - Civilian USAF T-28A conversion models; fitted with Wright R-1820-56S powerplant.
Nomad Mark II - Civilian USAF T-28A conversion models; fitted with Wright R-1820-76A powerplant.


Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 11/02/2020 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site; No A.I. was used in the generation of this content.

In the post-World War 2 world, North American Aviation drew up plans for a successor to its line of capable T-6 "Texan" twin-seat, single-engine basic trainers. The T-6, born in 1935, was built in nearly 15,500 examples and went on to serve a myriad of operators globally. The last of the lot was not retired until 1995 by the South African Air Force - such was its value. It was against this storied history that a new design was to emerge to take the place of one of America's most successful military trainer aircraft.

Immediately after the war, North American developed the "XSN2J-1" (company designation of "NA-142"), a prototype trainer platform which flew for the first time on February 10th, 1947. Two were built and intended for series use by the United States Navy. The twin-seat, single-engine design was powered by a Wright R-1820-78 "Cyclone" air-cooled radial piston engine of 1,100 horsepower driving a three-bladed propeller unit at the nose and was more or less of conventional design for the time.

The type was to be sued in the "scout-trainer" role and succeed an aging line of SNJ Texans then in service. However, the project was derailed by budgetary issues and cancelled outright in 1948.

From this existing framework, the beginnings of the T-28 "Trojan" were formed. North American developed the "XT-28" (company designation of "NA-159") and flew the monoplane on September 24th, 1949 for the first time, proving the new modified design sound. Two prototypes were completed and examples were delivered to Elgin Air Force Base during the middle of 1950 to be flight-tested under operational conditions by the 3020th Fighter Test Squadron. After this period, the design was formally approved and serial production ordered.

The aircraft continued North American's excellence in delivering capable military-level trainers. The design was of traditional arrangement, seating the engine in a tightly-fitted cowling ahead of the crew compartment. The cockpit involved a crew of two - student and instructor - seated in tandem under a lightly-framed canopy. The fuselage was well-rounded and streamlined, tapering at the tail at which point a single-finned, low-mounted horizontal plane arrangement was featured. The mainplanes were low-mounted along the fuselage sides, of straight design, and featuring clipped tips. A tricycle undercarriage, fully retractable, finished off the aircraft's list of physical qualities.

Adopted into service by the United States Air Force (USAF) in 1949, the newly-minted "T-28" was also taken into service by the United States Navy (USN), United States Marine Corps (USMC), United States Coast Guard (USCG), and (to a limited extend) the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in time.

Operators of the T-28 ultimately ranged from Argentina and Bolivia to Uruguay and Zaire. Beyond their given training roles, the series was also pressed into service as a ground-attack platform, primarily during the Vietnam War (1955-1975) by most of the major players there. The French used a stock in the Close-Air Support (CAS) role during actions over Algeria. The T-28 also in played a role with government forces of the Philippines during the rebel-led 1989 coup attempt.

Initial operational versions were the "T-28A", these going to the USAF and powered by the Wright R-1300-7 engine (driving a two-bladed propeller unit) with 1,194 examples built to the standard. The "T-28B" followed as a US Navy-centric variant carrying a Wright R-1820-86A/86B engine of 1,425 horsepower with included changes being a ventral air brake and three-bladed propeller unit. Total production reached 489 examples for the service. The T-28C became another USN version, this given an arrestor hook as well as reduced-length propeller blades.

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The T-28D "Nomad" were USN T-28B models converted for the COunter-INsurgency (COIN) role for the USAF during the Vietnam War. Various engine fits became available and broader support for air-to-ground weapons was instituted. Some 321 were converted to this standard by Pac-Aero. Another CAS attack-minded for became the "AT-28D" produced by Fairchild, again for service in Vietnam. Six underwing hardpoints were added as well as an ejection seat. Total conversions amounted to seventy-two airframes.

North American converted the T-28D into a COIN model by way of the "YAT-28E" prototype. This entry included a Lycoming YT-55L-9 turboprop engine, twelve underwing hardpoints, and 2 x 12.7mm Heavy Machine Guns (HMGs) in fixed, forward-firing mounts as standard features. Three prototypes were built to the standard with a first flight recorded in February of 1963. However, the model was not adopted and work on the design ended in 1965.

The French Air Force took on a stock of ex-USAF T-28A models as the T-28S/T-28F "Fennec". These were modified in 1959 with cockpit armoring, power-assisted canopy, four underwing hardpoints (for gun pods, rockets, and bombs), and a Wright R-1820-97 supercharged engine of 1,200 horsepower for their new owners and flown as COIN platforms into 1962. These were then later sold off to the Argentine Navy for carrier service as the "T-28P".

The T-28R "Nomair" was a modified, reduced-performance version for civilian flying. The design emerged from a stock of expiring T-28A models from the USAF and carried Wright "Cyclone" R-1820-80 engines and wider wingspans to achieve certification - which was granted in February of 1962.

Its militarized training form was built as the T-28R1 "Nomair I" and featured seating for two in tandem as well as redudant control schemes at both cockpit placements for student and instructor. The Brazilian Navy took on a stock of six aircraft in 1962 and, as such, had to have arrestor hooks installed for shipborne work. These later fell to the Brazilian Air Force before their time in the air ended.

The T-28R-2 "Nomair II" was an interesting conversion model for civilian market use - the fuselage was reworked to a five seat cabin. At least ten airframes were completed.

The "RT-28" became a photo-reconnaissance conversion model for COIN work by the Royal Lao Air Force during the Vietnam War. One T-28 example of the service is known to have defected to North Vietnam and was reused by its new host country - becoming the first fighter of the North Vietnamese Air Force inventory. During the conflict, the Republic of Vietnam Air Force also operated the series as a CAS platform while the USAF claimed a loss of twenty-three T-28s of their own in the war.

Total T-28 production reached 1,948 units and the line was eventually superseded by the turbo-prop powered Beechcraft T-34 "Mentor" in same role (this aircraft detailed elsewhere on this site). These were introduced in 1953 and produced through over 2,300 examples.


The T-28 also went on to form the basis for the Taiwanese "T-CH-1" by AIDC detailed elsewhere on this site. Fifty-two of these were built for the Republic of China Air Force for the trainer role after a first-flight in November of 1973.

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Operators
Global customers who have evaluated and/or operated the North American T-28 Trojan. Nations are displayed by flag, each linked to their respective national aircraft listing.

Total Production: 1,948 Units

Contractor(s): North American Aviation - USA
National flag of Argentina National flag of Bolivia National flag of Brazil National flag of Cuba National flag of the Dominican Republic National flag of Ecuador National flag of Ethiopia National flag of France National flag of modern Japan National flag of Mexico National flag of Morocco National flag of Nicaragua National flag of the Philippines National flag of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia National flag of South Korea National flag of Taiwan National flag of Thailand National flag of Tunisia National flag of the United States National flag of Uruguay National flag of Vietnam National flag of Zaire

[ Argentina; Bolivia; Brazil; Republic of the Congo; Cuba; Dominican Republic; Ecuador; Ethiopia; France; Honduras; Japan; Laos; Mexico; Morocco; Nicaragua; Philippines; South Korea; Saudi Arabia; South Vietnam; Tunisia; Taiwan; Thailand; United States; Uruguay; Vietnam; Zaire ]
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Similar
Developments of similar form-and-function, or related, to the North American T-28 Trojan.
Going Further...
The North American T-28 Trojan Two-Seat Basic Trainer Aircraft appears in the following collections:
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