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Yakovlev Yak-18 (Max)

Trainer Aircraft / Light Bomber Aircraft

Yakovlev Yak-18 (Max)

Trainer Aircraft / Light Bomber Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Soviet-era Yakovlev Yak-18 lived a long and storied operational life with fewer than 50 reportedly flying today.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Soviet Union
YEAR: 1946
STATUS: Active, Limited Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Yakovlev - Soviet Union
PRODUCTION: 1,200
OPERATORS: Afghanistan; Albania; Algeria; Austria; Bangladesh; Bulgaria; Cambodia; China; Czechoslovakia; East Germany; Egypt; Guinea; Hungary; Iraq; Laos; Mali; Mongolia; North Korea; Poland; Romania; Somalia; Soviet Union; Syria; Turkmenistan; Vietnam; Yemen; Zambia
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Yakovlev Yak-18 (Max) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 27.40 feet (8.35 meters)
WIDTH: 34.78 feet (10.6 meters)
HEIGHT: 10.99 feet (3.35 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 2,260 pounds (1,025 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 2,910 pounds (1,320 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Ivchenko AI-14RF radial piston engine developing 300 horsepower driving a two-bladed propeller at the nose.
SPEED (MAX): 186 miles-per-hour (300 kilometers-per-hour; 162 knots)
RANGE: 435 miles (700 kilometers; 378 nautical miles)
CEILING: 16,601 feet (5,060 meters; 3.14 miles)




ARMAMENT



OPTIONAL:
2 x Conventional Drop Bombs.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Yak-18 - Initial Production Models
• Yak-18A - Definitive Production Model; fitted with Ivchenco AI-14 FR engine of 260 horsepower.
• Yak-18U - Limited-production model with retractable tricycle undercarriage.
• Yak-18P ("Mouse") - Single-seat acrobatic mount
• Yak-18PM - Single-seat acrobatic mount with retractable tricycle undercarriage.
• Yak-18PS - Acrobatic variant with retractable tailwheel.
• Nanchang CJ-5 - Chinese designation for license-produced versions; 379 examples produced.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Yakovlev Yak-18 (Max) Trainer Aircraft / Light Bomber Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 11/6/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
During World War 2 (1939-1945), the Yakovlev UT-2 served as the standardized, primary aircraft trainer/fighter-trainer of Soviet airmen. The UT-2 was first flown in July of 1937 and ended production with 7,243 units with operators in Europe and Asia. From this, in May of 1945 with the war in Europe winding down, Alexander Yakovlev began design of a successor under the designation of Yak-18. First flight was quickly achieved and the aircraft was accepted into service in 1946, beginning a stellar production run that reached into 1956 and a service run that went much further than that. Operators proved plenty and ranged from Asia, Europe and Africa - mostly with Soviet-aligned nations and satellite states. Its simplicity allowed local licensed Chinese production under the designation CJ-5 by Nanchang.

The Yak-18 utilized a conventional configuration with a front-mounted engine (driving a two-bladed propeller assembly), single-finned tail unit and low-set monoplane wings. The main wings were fitted ahead of midships. The two crew sat in tandem under a long-running canopy. The undercarriage of early forms was partially retractable, the main legs semi-recessed under the wings and the tail wheel fixed in place.

Original production forms were designated simply as Yak-18. The Yak-18A utilized the Ivchenko AI-14 FR series engine of 260 horsepower and overtook production lines, becoming the definitive Yak-18 form. The Yak-18U was a limited-run model utilizing a retractable tricycle undercarriage. The Yak-18P ("Mouse") was a single-seat acrobatic platform, the Yak-18PM of similar scope though with retractable tricycle undercarriage and the Yak-18PS following suit but incorporating a retractable tailwheel. The sole foreign mark included the Nanchang CJ-5 of China and 379 aircraft of these were produced into 1958. China originally received the aircraft in 1950 as kits delivered from the Soviet Union for assembly before eventually turning to local factories for outright production of the design in the mid-1950s.




While a trainer by design, the Yak-18 was pressed into service as a light bomber by North Korea during the Korean War (1950-1953). Changes to the airframe were minimal for bomb racks were simply added to the fuselage centerline. Due to their slow speed, these light bomber Yak-18s were utilized by the North Koreans in night sorties - and this with limited effect. The United Nations assigned the reporting name of "Max" to the series.

Yak-18 numbers have increasingly dwindled over time, beginning to close the door on the storied Soviet-era design for good. Fewer than 50 make up the flyable stable today (2014).




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 200mph
Lo: 100mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (186mph).

    Graph average of 150 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Yakovlev Yak-18 (Max)'s operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1200
1200

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


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Supported Roles
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Interception
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Aerial Tanker
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A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
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