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Boeing L-15 Scout

Light Liaison Observation Aircraft

Boeing L-15 Scout

Light Liaison Observation Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The L-15 was a Boeing attempt at a light observation aircraft that was extremely portable, though the design did not lead up to any contracts for the firm.
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ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1947
STATUS: Retired, Out-of-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Boeing Wichita - USA
PRODUCTION: 12
OPERATORS: United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Boeing L-15 Scout model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 25.00 feet (7.62 meters)
WIDTH: 39.99 feet (12.19 meters)
HEIGHT: 8.69 feet (2.65 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 1,512 pounds (686 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 2,055 pounds (932 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Lycoming 0-290-7 engine developing 125 horsepower.
SPEED (MAX): 112 miles-per-hour (180 kilometers-per-hour; 97 knots)
CEILING: 16,398 feet (4,998 meters; 3.11 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 628 feet-per-minute (191 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



None.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• L-15 - Base Series Designation
• YL-15


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Boeing L-15 Scout Light Liaison Observation Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 2/13/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The L-15 Scout was a light and small observation liaison aircraft produced in limited numbers by the Boeing Aircraft Company following World War 2 - only twelve of the type were produced with the United States Army becoming its top operator. First flight was achieved on July 13th in 1947 and production spanned from 1947 into 1949.

The L-15 Scout represented a new direction for the Boeing company in the post-war world, a world that no longer needed high production rates and cutting edge designs of piston-engine combat aircraft. The all-metal construction L-15 was designed for operations from short runways (STOL - Short Take-Off and Landing) - wherever terrain might work against other larger aircraft - and specifically intended for the light scout observation role (the aircraft offered great all-around visibility), an attempt on Boeing's part to diversify its offerings in the post-war economy. The L-15 was designed at Boeing's Wichita, Kansas facility.

The L-15 Scout took on a distinct external configuration. The aircraft featured a high mounted monoplane wing assembly to which were affixed "flaperons", wing devices that could double as ailerons and flaps. The two-person crew, made up of the pilot and the observer, sat in a glassed-in nacelle-type fuselage under the main span of the wings. The engine was mounted at the extreme front of the fuselage with the empennage extended out over the rear portion of the aircraft. The tail section was distinctly adorned with twin vertical tail fins. The undercarriage was a conventional "tail-dragger", with two main landing gears and a tail wheel. All were fixed (no retraction of the units) and the tail wheel was positioned under the rearward portion of the fuselage nacelle. The aircrafts size made it suitable for transport in a C-97 aircraft, that is once broken down for the journey. Should the mission call for it, the L-15 could also be fitted with twin floats for water landings.




Power was derived from a single Lycoming O-290-7 series four cylinder air-cooled horizontally-opposed engine delivering 125 horsepower. A top speed of 112 miles per hour was possible along with a service ceiling of 16,400 feet. The aircraft could climb at a rate of 628 feet per minute and performance handling was reportedly quite good.

As fate would have it, the L-15 did not prove a financial success and became Boeing's final single-engine offering for the small-aircraft market. As can be inferred from the text, no firm L-15 Scout contracts were secured.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 120mph
Lo: 60mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (112mph).

    Graph average of 90 miles-per-hour.
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Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
12
12

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue