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Piasecki H-25 (HUP Retriever)

Tandem-Rotor Transport Helicopter

Piasecki H-25 (HUP Retriever)

Tandem-Rotor Transport Helicopter

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Piasecki H-25 series saw over a decade of service with several major naval powers of the world.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1949
STATUS: Retired, Out-of-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Piasecki Helicopter - USA
PRODUCTION: 339
OPERATORS: Canada; France; United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Piasecki H-25 (HUP Retriever) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 56.92 feet (17.35 meters)
WIDTH: 34.94 feet (10.65 meters)
HEIGHT: 12.47 feet (3.8 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 3,924 pounds (1,780 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 6,096 pounds (2,765 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Continental R-975-46A radial engine developing 550 horsepower while driving 2 x three-bladed tandem main rotors.
SPEED (MAX): 106 miles-per-hour (170 kilometers-per-hour; 92 knots)
RANGE: 342 miles (550 kilometers; 297 nautical miles)
CEILING: 10,007 feet (3,050 meters; 1.90 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 100 feet-per-minute (30 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



None.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• XHJP-1 (PV-14) - Initial prototype
• XHUP-1 (PV-16) - Pair of pre-production vehicles.
• HUP-1 (PV-18) - U.S. Navy operational model; powered by Continental R-975-34 piston engine of 525 horsepower; 32 examples completed.
• HUP-2 - Improved variant; powered by Continental R-975-46 piston engine of 550 horsepower; 165 examples produced for USN and 15 for French Navy.
• HUP-2S - Dedicated Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) conversion of HUP-2 model; dunking sonar-equipped; 12 examples completed.
• HUP-3 - Utility model fitted with Continental R-975-46A piston engine of 550 horsepower; 30 examples built (3 going to the Royal Canadian Navy).
• H-25A "Army Mule" - U.S. Army variant model of 1953; oversized cargo doors and reinforced cabin floor; powered by Continental R-975-46A engine of 550 horsepower; 70 examples completed with fifty eventually sent to the USN.
• UH-25A - HUP-1 production models redesignated following 1962.
• UH-25B - HUP-2 production models redesignated following 1962.
• UH-25C - HUP-3 production models dedesignated following 1962.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Piasecki H-25 (HUP Retriever) Tandem-Rotor Transport Helicopter.  Entry last updated on 3/19/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
World War 2 (1939-1945) saw the birth of the military helicopter as a viable over-battlefield instrument with the Germans making strong strides in the field for their part. The Americans also delved into the new aircraft category and were ultimately were able to showcase several prominent forms of their own. In the post-World War 2 world, development was rather consistent and concerns like Piasecki Helicopter Corporation (established in 1940) did much to further the value of helicopters going forward.

Retriever Walk-Around
One contribution by the company was the HUP "Retriever", a tandem-rotor platform of rather basic workmanlike appearance. Its design involved a slender, tapering fuselage which seated the cockpit crew (two pilots) at the extreme nose behind large windscreens for excellent viewing. One of the main rotors was set above the cockpit roof and the other was mounted high atop a vertical structure at the aft-end of the fuselage - the blades spinning in overlapping fashion. In-between was a cargo area that could be reworked to undertake other roles. The undercarriage was wheeled and fixed giving the helicopter a noticeable "nose-up" appearance when at rest.

The USN Requirement
Origins of the Retriever lay in a 1945 United States Navy (USN) requirement for a utility-minded helicopter with a Search and Rescue (SAR) capability. The type would be engineered to launch and land on moving warships of the USN inventory so certain care needed to be given to structural strength as well as dimensions. Beyond a submission by Piasecki was one by helicopter powerhouse Sikorsky which attempted to entice the USN with its XHJS-1 proposal. The prototype form from Piasecki was designated XHJP-1 and known internally to Piasecki as PV-14. It flew for the first time in March of 1948 and, following selection by the USN, was formally introduced for service in 1949.

Retriever Variants
XHUP-1 was used to mark a pair of pre-production examples which were recognized internally by Piasecki as the PV-16. Initial production models were the HUP-1 (Piasecki Model PV-18) and these were operated by the United States Navy in the utility and Search and Rescue (SAR) roles. Power to this variant came from a single Continental R-975-34 piston engine of 525 horsepower. Production totaled 32 examples.




Piasecki H-25 (HUP Retriever) (Cont'd)

Tandem-Rotor Transport Helicopter

Piasecki H-25 (HUP Retriever) (Cont'd)

Tandem-Rotor Transport Helicopter



Improvements to the line arrived in the HUP-2 which carried a Continental R-975-46 piston engine of 550 horsepower and autopilot function. The USN obtained 165 of these while the French Navy (Aeronavale) secured fifteen of their own. In the service-wide 1962 U.S. military designation reorganization, the model became the UH-25B.

The HUP-2S was modified as a dedicated Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) platform and built upon the existing framework of the HUP-2 variant complete with a dunking sonar for tracking / locating enemy submarines. Twelve of the type were produced. The HUP-3 became a utility-minded form based in the H-25A and outfitted with a Continental R-975-46A piston engine. Thirty were built of which three were delivered to the Royal Canadian Navy. After 1962, these became the UH-25C.

The Failed U.S. Army Mule
From the H-25A mark was born the H-25A "Army Mule" for the United States Army. This was a utility transport platform and powered by the Continental R-975-46A series piston engine of 550 horsepower. The fuselage was given oversized doors along with a reinforced cabin floor for the rigors of Army service. Production then totaled seventy units from 1953 onward. However, once in service, this variant under-performed and a stock of fifty were transferred to USN service. Army operation of the Army Mule lasted just until 1958 before which point the series was relegated to helicopter training and little more.

Operators and Total Production
The HUP / H-25 Retriever was operated by Canada (Navy), France (Navy), and the United States (Army and Navy) during its time aloft. Total production of the series reached 339 examples and formal retirement of the line occurred in 1964.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 120mph
Lo: 60mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (106mph).

    Graph average of 90 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
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  MSK
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  TKY
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  SYD
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Piasecki H-25 (HUP Retriever)'s operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
339
339

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
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