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Mil Mi-17 (Hip-H)

Medium-Lift Transport Helicopter / Gunship

Mil Mi-17 (Hip-H)

Medium-Lift Transport Helicopter / Gunship

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
IMAGES
Overview



The Mil Mi-17 transport helicopter was born from the original Mi-8 series as an improved form.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Soviet Union
YEAR: 1981
STATUS: Active, In-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant - Soviet Union / Russian Helicopters / Kazan - Russia
PRODUCTION: 12,000
OPERATORS: Afghanistan; Argentina; Cambodia; China; Colombia; Croatia; India; Iraq; Kenya; Libya; Macedonia; Malaysia; Mexico; North Korea; Pakistan; Russia; Slovakia; Sri Lanka; South Sudan; Soviet Union; Thailand
National flag of Afghanistan
AFG
National flag of Argentina
ARG
National flag of Cambodia
CAM
National flag of China
CHN
National flag of Colombia
COL
National flag of Croatia
CRO
National flag of India
IND
National flag of Iraq
IRQ
National flag of Kenya
KEN
National flag of Libya
LIB
National flag of Macedonia
MAC
National flag of Malaysia
MLA
National flag of Mexico
MEX
National flag of North Korea
NKO
National flag of Pakistan
PAK
National flag of Russia
RUS
National flag of Slovakia
SLK
National flag of South Sudan
SSU
National flag of Soviet Union
USSR
National flag of Sri Lanka
SRI
National flag of Sudan
SUD
National flag of Thailand
THL
Technical Specifications



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Mil Mi-17 (Hip-H) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 3
POWER: 2 x Klimov TV3-117MT/VM OR VK-2500 turboshaft engines developing 2,100 shp or 2,700 shp respectively while driving five-bladed main rotor and three-bladed tail rotor.
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LENGTH

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HEIGHT

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SPEED (MAX)

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CEILING

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RANGE

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CLIMB RATE

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Armament



Typically none unless outfitted for gunship/armed transport role: Missiles (Shturm-V), rockets (S-8), rocket pods, 23mm cannon pods, and 7.62mm gun pods across underwing hardpoints when fitted wingstubs; 7.62mm machine guns at doors and / or rear of aircraft. Optional nose machine gun and fuel tanks.
Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Graphical image of an aircraft machine gun pod
Graphical image of an aircraft cannon pod
Graphical image of aircraft aerial rockets
Graphical image of an aircraft rocket pod
Graphical image of an aircraft external fuel tank
Variants / Models



• Mi-17 (Hip-H) - Base Series Designation
• Mi-17-1
• Mi-17-1M
• Mi-17-1V
• Mi-17-1VA
• Mi-17-2
• Mi-17V-3
• Mi-17V-5
• Mi-17V-7
• Mi-17M
• Mi-17MD
• Mi-17KF
• Mi-17N
• Mi-17P
• Mi-17PG
• Mi-17PI
• Mi-17PP
• Mi-17S
• Mi017AE
• Mi-17LPZS
• Mi-17Z-2 "Prehrada"


History



Detailing the development and operational history of the Mil Mi-17 (Hip-H) Medium-Lift Transport Helicopter / Gunship.  Entry last updated on 2/18/2019. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The original Mil Mi-8 "Hip" medium-lift transport helicopter series first flew in prototype form on July 7th, 1961 and was introduced in 1967. Since then, over 17,000 examples of the type have been produced while the series maintains an active presence within the inventories of many air services today (2015). The Mi-17 "Hip" model - based on the Mi-8M/MT variant of the Soviet/Russian military - was developed with exportation in mind and has been adopted by over twenty nations worldwide. The Mi-17 model achieved its own first flight in 1975 and was introduced in 1981. Notable serial production has been ongoing since 1977 with totals reaching around 12,000 units with production shared between the Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant as well as the Kazan Helicopter Plant.

Externally, the Mi-17 product shares many of the same features with its earlier cousin including a well-glazed cockpit offering good vision, sliding side doors access with rear loading ramp, and fixed wheeled tricycle undercarriage. One discernable difference is in the tail rotor mounting which now faces starboard instead of port side. The cockpit area has been given improved protection through additional armoring and larger Klimov TV3-117VM turboshaft engines have increased performance - the main rotor and gearbox are based on those developed for the Mi-14.

Beyond its traditional role of personnel/cargo hauler, the Mi-17 can be outfitted for the gunship role, typically through multi-shot rocket pods fitted along wing stub mountings. Other versions have been equipped for Search and Rescue (SAR), VIP/general passenger transport, high-altitude, MEDEVAC, Electronic Warfare (EW), and airborne Command Post (CP) service. It has seen its fair share of operations over active combat zones ranging from Cambodia and India/Pakistan to Columbia, Macedonia, and Sri Lanka. Mi-17s were used by both sides of the Libyan Civil War (2011) and the rebuilding Afghan Air Force relies heavily on its Mi-17 fleet.

Operators currently range from Afghanistan and Argentina to Sri Lanka and Thailand. China began local license production of the Mi-17 during May of 2008 and, despite its Cold War-era roots, the Mi-17 remains very much in play today with several nations still considering order of the type.

The base designation of the line is Mi-17 and it is known to NATO as "Hip-H". The Mi-8AMT based model is the Mi-17-1 for export. The Mi-17-1M is its high-altitude performance equivalent. The Mi-17-1VA serves in the airborne hospital role while the Mi-17-2 is the Mi-8MTV-2. The Mi-8MTV-3 becomes the Mi-17V-3 and the Mi-8MTV-5 is the Mi-17V-5. The Mi-17V-7 is outfitted with VK-2500 engines and its loading ramp has been replaced by clam shell-style doors. The Mi-17M was a test bed for what became the Mi-17MD (Mi-17V-5). New avionics greeted the Mi-7KF. Night operations support was brought to the Mi-17N. General passenger hauling service was through the Mi-17P variant. The Mi-8MTG became the export Mi-17PG. The Mi-17S serves as a VIP passenger model. Various other designs have been added to the Mi-17 product line.




Program Updates

June 2018 - India's border security service has taken on six refurbished Mi-17V model helicopters from Russian Helicopters. The service utilized ten V-models for various border-related missions.
Media





General Assessment
Firepower  
Performance  
Survivability  
Versatility  
Impact  


Values are derrived from a variety of categories related to the design, overall function, and historical influence of this aircraft in aviation history.
MF Power Rating
38
The MF Power Rating takes into account over 60 individual factors related to this aircraft entry. The rating is out of 100 total possible points.
Relative Maximum Speed
Hi: 200mph
Lo: 100mph
This entry's maximum listed speed (158mph).

Graph average of 150 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Mil Mi-17 (Hip-H)'s operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production (12,000)
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
12000
12000

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.


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