×
Aircraft / Aviation Vehicles & Artillery Small Arms Warships & Submarines Military Ranks Military Pay Scale (2024) Special Forces

de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver


Utility Transport Aircraft


Canada | 1948



"Over 1,600 examples of the de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver were produced over a two-decade span."

Power & Performance
Those special qualities that separate one aircraft design from another. Performance specifications presented assume optimal operating conditions for the de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Utility Transport Aircraft.
1 x Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior radial piston engine developing 450 horsepower.
Propulsion
158 mph
255 kph | 138 kts
Max Speed
15,046 ft
4,586 m | 3 miles
Service Ceiling
455 miles
732 km | 395 nm
Operational Range
1,020 ft/min
311 m/min
Rate-of-Climb
Structure
The nose-to-tail, wingtip-to-wingtip physical qualities of the de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Utility Transport Aircraft.
1
(MANNED)
Crew
30.2 ft
9.22 m
O/A Length
48.0 ft
(14.63 m)
O/A Width
9.0 ft
(2.74 m)
O/A Height
3,000 lb
(1,361 kg)
Empty Weight
5,099 lb
(2,313 kg)
MTOW
Variants
Notable series variants as part of the de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver family line.
DHC-2 "Beaver" - Base Series Name
Beaver Mk I - Initial utility model
Beaver AL Mk I - British Army designation of the Mk I
Beaver C-127 - U.S. Army designation until 1962
Beaver YL-20 - U.S. Army designation of evaluation models.
L-20A Beaver (U-6A) - U.S. Army model; 968 units completed.
L-20B Beaver (U-6B) - U.S. Army model with slight changes from A-model forms; six total units.
Beaver Mk II - One-off form with Alvis Leonides radial piston engine fitted.
Wipaire "Boss Turbo-Beaver" - Post-military L-20 models
Turbo-Beaver Mk III - Fitted with PW PT6A-6/-20 turboprop engines.
Airtech Canada DHC-2 (PZL-3S) - Post-military model with Ivchenko PZL-3S radial engine of 600 horsepower.
Volpar "Model 4000" - Model of 1972; AiResearch turboprop engine driving three-bladed propeller; all-new tail unit.
Viking DHC-2T "Turbo Beaver" - Fitted with PWC PT6A-34 turboprop engine of 680 horsepower.
Authored By: Dan Alex | Last Edited: 08/24/2018 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site; No A.I. was used in the generation of this content.

Introduced in 1948, the de Havilland Canada DHC-2 "Beaver" went on to achieve global popularity with over 35 operators using the type and production reaching an impressive post-World War 2 total of 1,657 units. Manufacture of the aircraft spanned from 1947 until 1967 and the successful DHC-2 also went on to form the basis for the similar DHC-3 "Otter" series detailed elsewhere on this site. While production of the DHC-2 has since closed, the aircraft line is still in active service throughout the world today (2016) with no sign of its end coming soon.

The DHC-2 was developed along the lines of a utility-minded platform with inherent Short Take-Off and Landing (STOL) capabilities. This meant a lightweight overall design with good power stemming from a single engine and a shoulder-mounted wing structure to maximize lift and agility. First flight of a prototype was on August 16th, 1947 with service introduction arriving in 1948.

Origins of the DHC-2 lay in the years immediately following the close of World War 2 (1945). The world aircraft market saw a dramatic shift away from military platforms to civilian-market types and de Havilland - makers of the famous wartime twin-engined DH.98 "Mosquito" series - followed suit. Research centered on delivering a new aircraft to "bush" pilots - one of rugged, sound and reliable design. Due to the variable environments that the new aircraft could operate across, a floatplane and wheeled undercarriage was developed to suit customer needs. Large side doors, placed along both fuselage sides, was another of the notable requirements bush pilots made. The engine of choice became the Pratt & Whitney Canada "Wasp Junior" radial of 450 horsepower - these left over from the Canadian war effort. Design work began in 1946.

The DHC-2 was not an outright commercial success. However slowly-but-surely its capabilities became known within certain flight circles. It was not until its major endorsement arrived through the United States Army selection as its next general purpose utility transport that raised the export profile of the DHC-2 considerably. The U.S. Army used the aircraft to replace an aging stock of Cessna aircraft in the same utility transport role.

As completed, the DHC-2 needed only a single pilot to operate her. The passenger section carried up to six persons or 2,100 lb of cargo as needed. The primary engine fit became the Pratt & Whitney R-985 "Wasp Junior" radial of 450 horsepower which helped to provide speeds nearing 160 miles per hour (cruising was closer to 145 mph). Its range was out to 455 miles and the listed service ceiling was 18,000 feet. Rate-of-climb was a usable 1,020 feet per minute.

Since its inception, the DHC-2 has seen a plethora of variants emerge - the "Beaver I" was the original transport model and accepted into service with the British Army as the "Beaver AL Mk 1". The U.S. Army operated them under the "C-127" designation initially and then as the "L-20". These were tested as "YL-20". Another U.S. Army variant to emerge was the L-20A "Beaver" which then became the "U-6A" after the 1962 reorganization. About 968 of these were procured and followed by the "L-20B" - which became six "U-6B" systems after 1962.

The "Beaver II" was a form outfitted with the Alvis "Leonides" radial piston engine. The Wipaire "Super Beaver" were surplus U.S. Army and USAF types modified for post-military roles. The Wipaire "Boss Turbo Beaver" - as its name suggests - was given a turbo modification. The "Turbo-Beaver III" carried a Pratt & Whitney PT6A-6 or -20 series turboprop engine of 578 horsepower. Another post-military conversion model became the Airtech Canada DHC-2 which were given PZL-3S radial piston engines outputting 600 horsepower. The Volpar Model 4000 fitted an AiResearch TPE331-2U-203 turboprop engine driving a three-bladed propeller and was given an all-new tail fin. The Viking DHC-2T "Turbo Beaver" was a model completed by Viking Air with changes to include a Pratt & Whitney PT6A-34 series turboprop engine developing 680 horsepower.

The DHC-2 series has seen operational service with both military and civilian parties worldwide - from Argentina and Australia to Yugoslavia and Zambia.

Content ©MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
Operators
Global customers who have evaluated and/or operated the de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver. Nations are displayed by flag, each linked to their respective national aircraft listing.

Total Production: 1,657 Units

Contractor(s): de Havilland Canada - Canada
National flag of Argentina National flag of Austria National flag of Chile National flag of Colombia National flag of Cuba National flag of the Dominican Republic National flag of France National flag of Finland National flag of Greece National flag of Indonesia National flag of Iran National flag of the Netherlands National flag of New Zealand National flag of Oman National flag of Peru National flag of the Philippines National flag of Thailand National flag of Turkey National flag of Uganda National flag of the United Kingdom National flag of the United States National flag of Uruguay National flag of Vietnam National flag of Yemen National flag of Yugoslavia National flag of Zambia

[ Argentina; Austria; Burma; Cambodia; Chile; Colombia; Cuba; Dominican Republic; Finland; France; Ghana; Greece; Haiti; Indonesia; Iran; Kenya; Laos; Netherlands; New Zealand; Oman; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; South Vietnam; South Yemen; Thailand; Turkey; Uganda; United Kingdom; United States; Uruguay; Yugoslavia; Zambia ]
1 / 3
Image of the de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver
Image from the United States Department of Defense DIVDS image network.
2 / 3
Image of the de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver
Image from the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.
3 / 3
Image of the de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver
Image from the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

Going Further...
The de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Utility Transport Aircraft appears in the following collections:
HOME
AVIATION INDEX
AIRCRAFT BY COUNTRY
AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURERS
COMPARE AIRCRAFT
AIRCRAFT BY CONFLICT
AIRCRAFT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT BY DECADE
COLD WAR AIRCRAFT
MODERN AIRCRAFT
VIETNAM WAR AIRCRAFT
Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Cookies

2024 Military Pay Scale Military Ranks of the World U.S. Department of Defense Dictionary Conversion Calculators Military Alphabet Code Military Map Symbols Breakdown U.S. 5-Star Generals List WWII Weapons by Country World War Next

The "Military Factory" name and MilitaryFactory.com logo are registered ® U.S. trademarks protected by all applicable domestic and international intellectual property laws. All written content, illustrations, and photography are unique to this website (unless where indicated) and not for reuse/reproduction in any form. Material presented throughout this website is for historical and entertainment value only and should not to be construed as usable for hardware restoration, maintenance, or general operation. We do not sell any of the items showcased on this site. Please direct all other inquiries to militaryfactory AT gmail.com. No A.I. was used in the generation of this content.

Part of a network of sites that includes GlobalFirepower, a data-driven property used in ranking the top military powers of the world, WDMMA.org (World Directory of Modern Military Aircraft), WDMMW.org (World Directory of Modern Military Warships), SR71blackbird.org, detailing the history of the world's most iconic spyplane, and MilitaryRibbons.info, cataloguing military medals and ribbons. Special Interest: RailRoad Junction, the locomotive encyclopedia.


©2024 www.MilitaryFactory.com • All Rights Reserved • Content ©2003-2024 (21yrs)