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Avia S-199 (Bf 109G)

Single-Seat Monoplane Fighter

Avia S-199 (Bf 109G)

Single-Seat Monoplane Fighter

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The German wartime Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter became the S-199 in post-war Czech Air Force and Israeli Air Force service.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Czechoslovakia
YEAR: 1948
STATUS: Retired, Out-of-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Avia - Czechoslovakia
PRODUCTION: 603
OPERATORS: Czechoslovakia; Israel
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Avia S-199 (Bf 109G) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 29.36 feet (8.95 meters)
WIDTH: 32.55 feet (9.92 meters)
HEIGHT: 8.53 feet (2.6 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 5,842 pounds (2,650 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 8,245 pounds (3,740 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Junkers Jumo 211F V-12 inverted Vee, liquid-cooled inline piston engine developing 1,322 horsepower and driving a three-bladed propeller at the nose.
SPEED (MAX): 367 miles-per-hour (590 kilometers-per-hour; 319 knots)
RANGE: 621 miles (1,000 kilometers; 540 nautical miles)
CEILING: 28,494 feet (8,685 meters; 5.40 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 2,200 feet-per-minute (671 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



STANDARD, FIXED:
2 x 20mm MG 151/20 cannons
2 x 13mm MG 131 Heavy Machine Guns (HMGs)

OPTIONAL:
1 x 551lb bomb OR 4 x 155lb bombs.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• S-199 - Base Series Designation
• S-99 (C.10) - Variant based on the Bf 109G-6 production model; 21 examples completed.
• CS-99 (C.10) - Two-seat training variant based on the Bf 109G-12 production model; 23 examples completed.
• S-199 (C.210) - Definitive production model; fitted with Junkers Jumo 211F inline piston engine; 559 examples completed.
• CS-199 - Two-seat training variant based on the S-199 production model.
• D-199 - Dedicated reconnaissance variant


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Avia S-199 (Bf 109G) Single-Seat Monoplane Fighter.  Entry last updated on 6/22/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Messerschmitt Bf 109 became one of the classic fighting aircraft of World War 2 (1939-1945), being progressively updated throughout the conflict to keep the line viable. The type was produced in the tens of thousands and proved the perfect counter to the English Supermarine Spitfire for her entire involvement in the war. The line was so successful that many forms soldiered on into the post-war years under various guises and with various global operators.

Towards the end of the conflict, Avia of Czechoslovakia was charged with producing the Bf 109G (G-6 and G-14 models) single-seat fighters as well as the related Bf 109G-12, a twin-seat flight training platform. Despite this initiative, the war in Europe was over in May of 1945, leaving Czechoslovakia with large supplies of Bf 109 airframes without owners. This led to the company to completing at least twenty-one Bf 109G-6 fighters under the factory designation of "C-10" and these were operated by the Czechoslovakians as the "S-99". The training version, of which twenty-three were completed, became the "CS-99". The S-99 was issued to the Czechoslovakian National Air Guard.

By and large, these aircraft were faithful to their wartime counterparts but lack of additional Daimler-Benz DB605 inline engines soon meant that Avia was forced to find a suitable powerplant replacement - so this became the Junkers Jumo 211F V-12 inline engine of 1,350 horsepower which were readily available to the company (and also powered the wartime Heinkel He 111 medium bombers of Germany). The end result was a Bf 109 offshoot designated locally as the "S-199" and, in both form and function, the S-199 was essentially a re-engined Bf 109G model. Armament included 2 x 20mm MG151/20 cannons under the wings and 2 x 13mm MG131 machine guns over the nose. The hub-mounted cannon was not included in the armament mix. Beyond the standard, fixed weaponry was provision to carry a single 551lb bomb or up to 4 x 155lb bombs.

A prototype S-199 went airborne for the first time in March of 1947.

The Czechoslovakia Air Force received its first S-199 in February of 1948 and production by Avia eventually totaled 559 aircraft. The reworked fighter was not an outright success for it proved to have poor handling when compared to the original incarnation mainly due to the replacement engine fit. There was also a possibility of the synchronizing gear for the cowl machine guns to fail and have the pilot shoot off his own propeller during flight. Nevertheless, it was available in the numbers necessary and provided local industry with work and Czech airmen with a flying classroom. Production of the S-199 spanned into 1951 and beyond the S-199 fighter version was the armed CS-199 trainer form (built from the S-199 stock) and the unarmed C-210 trainer form. The D-199 was a dedicated reconnaissance platform.

Israel become the other prominent S-199 operator when, in May of 1948, the country secured an order for twenty-five of the fighters to stock its newly-founded Israeli Air Force (IAF). These quickly formed the IAF's first fighter squadron (101 Squadron and were pressed into combat service against neighboring Egypt as soon as they were readied. These aircraft were used in the air-to-air and air-to-ground role and claimed the first Israeli air victories in IAF history. Despite their seemingly good showing, the fighters were not well-liked by air and ground crews due to their reliability and combat performance. The type also proved tough to keep flying under combat conditions.

As completed, the S-199 featured an overall length of 29.3 feet, a wingspan of 32.5 feet and a height of 8.5 feet. Empty weight was 5,850lb against an MTOW of 8,245lb. Performance included a maximum speed of 370 miles per hour with a combat radius of 530 miles and a service ceiling reaching 28,500 feet. Rate-of-climb was 2,200 feet-per-minute.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 400mph
Lo: 200mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (367mph).

    Graph average of 300 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
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  BER
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  MSK
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  SYD
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Avia S-199's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
603
603

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue