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Focke-Wulf Fw P.VII (Flitzer)

Jet-and-Rocket-Powered Fighter Proposal

Focke-Wulf Fw P.VII (Flitzer)

Jet-and-Rocket-Powered Fighter Proposal

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Focke-Wulf Fw P.7 jet-and-rocket-powered fighter only reached the mock-up stage before the end of World War 2.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Nazi Germany
YEAR: 1944
MANUFACTURER(S): Focke-Wulf - Nazi Germany
PRODUCTION: 0
OPERATORS: Nazi Germany
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Focke-Wulf Fw P.VII (P.7) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 34.61 feet (10.55 meters)
WIDTH: 26.25 feet (8 meters)
HEIGHT: 7.71 feet (2.35 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 6,019 pounds (2,730 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 9,590 pounds (4,350 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Heinkel HeS 011 turbojet engine developing 3,305 lb of thrust with 1 x Walter HWK 109-509A liquid rocket motor generating 3,750 lb of thrust.
SPEED (MAX): 593 miles-per-hour (955 kilometers-per-hour; 516 knots)
RANGE: 466 miles (750 kilometers; 405 nautical miles)
CEILING: 45,276 feet (13,800 meters; 8.57 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 3,600 feet-per-minute (1,097 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



PROPOSED STANDARD:
2 x 30mm MK 103 OR MK 108 cannons in nose
2 x 20mm MG 151/20 cannons in wings
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• P.VII "Flitzer" ("Dasher") - Base Product Designation
• P.7 - Alternative Designation Form


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Focke-Wulf Fw P.VII (Flitzer) Jet-and-Rocket-Powered Fighter Proposal.  Entry last updated on 5/26/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The situation in Germany during World War 2 was one that forced its aviation industry to continually supply solutions to counter growing Allied air superiority and the devastating day/night bombing campaigns. This provided something of a "clean canvas" approach for aviation engineers looking to make a name for themselves or further design theories. As turbojet technology progressed, this opened the door to some fantastic aircraft designs of which many never saw the light of day. The Focke-Wulf Fw "Flitzer" (meaning "Streaker" / "Flasher") became one of the war's forgotten fighter proposals, losing out to the Focke-Wulf's other product, the Ta 183 "Huckabein" by Hans Multhopp by the end. The Flitzer was also known under its project designation of "P.7" or "P.VII" for "Project Seven".

Design work on the fighter began during March of 1943 and was part of a greater Focke-Wulf company initiative to provide a single-seat, turbo-jet-powered solution for possible submission to the Luftwaffe. The earliest offering was known as Project VI ("P.6") which was more or less faithful to the P.7 - save for a slightly different canopy, fuselage, and air intake position. The resulting design utilized a centralized fuselage nacelle which blended into a swept-back wing mainplane assembly (swept at 32-degrees)). The cockpit was held under a canopy positioned aft of the nose cone with the planned turbojet engine installation at the rear. The single engine would be aspirated through a dual intake scheme which placed ports at each wing root. Control surfaces were located along the wing mainplane's trailing edges and a twin-boom configuration was selected that utilized stems emanating from near the midway point of the mainplanes and joined together at the rear by a single, high-mounted plane - producing a twin rudder approach. The undercarriage was to be all-wheeled and fully-retractable - a tricycle configuration proposed for a most modern appearance. As a fighter, proposed armament was 2 x 30mm MK 103 or MK 108 series cannons in the nose with 2 x 20mm MK 151/20 cannons in the wings (one per wing).

The initial design plan called for a combination propulsion arrangement - a Henkel HeS 011A turbojet paired with a Walter HWK 509 A-2 rocket engine. The rocket installation was intended to help produce a greater initial rate-of-climb for the fighter attempting to intercept incoming threats. Ultimately, the last revision of the aircraft featured only the turbojet engine.

Focke-Wulf engineers completed hand-held "free-flight" and wind tunnel models while a full-scale wooden mockup was ordered to help sell the product to German authorities. However, no amount of work on the product sold the idea for adoption as the P.VII was eventually given up by war's end - several other designs had already leaped ahead including the Ta 183 and the in-service Messerschmitt Me 262 "Schwalbe" jet fighter. The P.VII did finish its mockup stage and saw finalized manufacture plans as well as a few assembly components completed.

Estimated performance figures of the P.VII fighter included a maximum speed of 593 miles per hour, a service ceiling of 42,500 feet, and a rate-of-climb of 3,600 feet-per-minute. Dimensions were a length of 34.6 feet, a wingspan of 26.2 feet, and a height of 7.7 feet.

It is interesting to note that the twin-boom approach was used to good effect by several British jet-powered aircraft to emerge after the war including the storied de Havilland "Vampire" - which closely mimicked the wartime German fighter proposal.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 750mph
Lo: 375mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (593mph).

    Graph average of 562.5 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
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  BER
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  MSK
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  SYD
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Focke-Wulf Fw P.VII (P.7)'s operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
0
0

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
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