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Cessna 172 (Skyhawk)

Light Utility / Multirole Aircraft

Cessna 172 (Skyhawk)

Light Utility / Multirole Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
IMAGES
Overview



The Cessna 172 has proven a critical commercial success for the Cessna Aircraft Company to the tune of 44,000 units built since 1956.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1956
STATUS: Active, In-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Cessna Aircraft Company / Textron Aviation - USA
PRODUCTION: 44,000
OPERATORS: Austria; Australia; Bolivia; Brazil; Canada; Chile; China; Ecuador; Finland; France; Guatemala; Honduras; Iraq; Ireland; Italy; Japan; Liberia; Lithuania; Madagascar; Norway; Pakistan; Philippines; Portugal; Russia; Saudi Arabia; Singapore; South Africa; South Korea; Spain; Sweden; United Kingdom; United States
National flag of Australia
AUS
National flag of Austria
AST
National flag of Bolivia
BOL
National flag of Brazil
BRA
National flag of Canada
CAN
National flag of Chile
CHI
National flag of China
CHN
National flag of Ecuador
ECU
National flag of Finland
FIN
National flag of France
FRA
National flag of Guatemala
GUA
National flag of Honduras
HON
National flag of Iraq
IRQ
National flag of Ireland
IRE
National flag of Italy
ITA
National flag of Japan
JPN
National flag of Liberia
LBR
National flag of Lithuania
LIT
National flag of Madagascar
MDG
National flag of Norway
NOR
National flag of Pakistan
PAK
National flag of Philippines
PHI
National flag of Portugal
POR
National flag of Russia
RUS
National flag of Saudi Arabia
SAU
National flag of Singapore
SIN
National flag of South Africa
SAF
National flag of South Korea
SKO
National flag of Spain
SPA
National flag of Sweden
SWE
National flag of United Kingdom
UK
National flag of United States
USA
Technical Specifications



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Cessna 172 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
POWER: (Variable): 1 x Continental O-300 six-cylinder, air-cooled engine developing 145 horsepower; 1 x Textron Lycoming IO-360-L2A engine of 180 horsepower.
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Armament



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Variants / Models



• 172 - Base Series Designation; original production form of 1955; gross weight of 2,200lb; powered by Continental O-300 145 horsepower engine; 4,195 examples.
• 172A - Model of 1960; swept-back tail fin; 1,015 examples.
• 172B - Model of 1960 (late); revised undercarriage and engine mounting with redesigned cowling; Skyhawk package made available; increased gross weight to 2,205lb.
• 172C - Model of 1962; internal changes; 889 examples.
• 172D - Model of 1963; modified lower rear fuselage; wrap-around rear window; revised front windshield; 1,146 examples.
• 172E - Model of 1964; switch to electrical fuses; revised instrument panel; 1,401 examples.
• 172F - Model of 1965; electrically-driven flaps; 1,436 examples.
• 172G - Model of 1966; revised spinner; 1,597 examples.
• 172H - Model of 1967; short-stroke nose gear oleo; revised cowling; electric stall warning indicator (instead of horn version).
• 172I - Model of 1968; initial Lycoming-powered model; Lycoming O-320-E2D engine of 150 horsepower; slightly increased performance.
• 172J - Proposed cantilever-wing / stabilitor; not enacted due to dealer pressure.
• 172K - Model of 1969; redesigned tail fin and rear window panes; optional long-range fuel tanks; 1,170 examples.
• 172L - Model of 1971; modified main landing gear legs; 1,811 examples.
• 172M - Model of 1973; dropped leading wing edge introduced; 7,306 examples.
• 172N (Skyhawk 100) - Model of 1977; O-320-H2AD engine fitted; rudder trim option.
• 172O - Designation not used.
• 172P (Skyhawk P) - Model of 1981; Lycoming O-320-D2J with improved performance and reliability; 196 examples.
• 172Q "Cutlass" - Model of 1983; IO-360-A4N engine of 180 horsepower; gross weight of 2,550lb.
• 172R - Model of 1996; IO-360-L2A engine of 160 horsepower; fuel-injection; gross weight of 2,450lb.
• 172RG "Cutlass" - Retractable Gear variant; model of 1980.
• 172S - Model of 1998; IO-360-L2A engine of 180 horsepower; Garmin G1000 avionics optional.
• Reims FR172J - Rolls-Royce FI Continental IO-360-H(B) engine of 210 horsepower.
• R172K "Hawk XP" - Model of 1977; Continental FI IO-360K engine of 195 horsepower.
• 172TD - Model of 2007; porposed diesel-fueled variant; not furthered.
• 172 Electric - Model of 2010; proposed electric-powered variant; successfully test-flown.
• T-41 "Mescalero" - USAF flight training platform; introduced in 1964 and produced into 1996.


History



Detailing the development and operational history of the Cessna 172 (Skyhawk) Light Utility / Multirole Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 5/9/2019. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Cessna Model 172 is the most successful light aircraft in history with 44,000 production units made since series introduction occurred in 1956 (and production continuing today - 2018). The Model 172 was developed from the earlier Model 170 which appeared in 1948 as a single-engine, shoulder-winged general aviation aircraft with fixed, "tail-dragging" undercarriage through 5,174 examples. The follow-on Model 172 found huge success in the general aviation market as well as the military sphere and, despite its Cold War-era introduction, continues to "fly high" even today (2018).

The Cessna 172 was drawn up as an improved version of the original Model 170. The series was first-flown in January of 1955 as the "Model 170C" and carried a Continental O-300-A engine driving a two-bladed propeller unit at the nose. The tailfin and elevators were both redesigned from the original and were given an increase to surface area for added stability and control. Further changes (following certification) of the C-model ultimately introduced the iconic fixed, wheeled tricycle undercarriage common to Model 172 aircraft today. Cabin seating allowed for four-to-five persons to be carried including the pilot. Forward positions numbered two (side-by-side) with the remaining three in the back (side-by-side-by-side). In this revised form, the aircraft was first-flown on June 12th, 1955 and was introduced for service as the "Model 172". The type proved immediately popular with thousands being manufactured in the first few years of availability alone.

Throughout the course of its operational service life, the Cessna 172 underwent an evolution that saw both minor and major revisions to the line - increasing gross weights, aerodynamic efficiency, performance, ergonomics and the like. Modifications allowed for floatplane /amphibious models to emerge and the type was also taken into military service by the USAF as a flight trainer through the T-41 "Mescalero" variant (detailed elsewhere on this site). The Model 172A of 1960 introduced the modern swept-back tail fin while the "Skyhawk" deluxe package was introduced in the Model 172B of late-1960. The Model 172I of 1968 was the first to switch over to the Lycoming O-320-E2D engine of 150 horsepower (thereby increasing some performance figures).

Various other military powers soon adopted the type in useful numbers for both land- and sea-based service to undertake a plethora of roles. The Model 172 has since evolved to much more modern forms today (2018) all the while retaining its versatility, reliability, and popularity - making it a sound choice for first-time student flyers and veteran general aviation buffs alike.

The Cessna 172 as a Record-Setter
In 1958, the Cessna 172 was used to set an endurance record in which the aircraft covered 64 days, 22 hours, 19 minutes and 5 seconds in a flight originating from, and ending at, McCarran Airfield in Las Vegas, Nevada. With some modifications in place as well as a very detailed flight plan, the aircraft with its crew of two were able to make the round-the-world journey in the light airplane. The flight went down in the history books and the record stands to this day.

Performance

The base Model 172R form offers a cruising speed of 140 miles per hour with a range of 800 miles. Its service ceiling is 13,500 feet and rate-of-climb reaches 720 feet-per-minute. Empty weight is 1,700lb against an MTOW of 2,450lb. The Garmin 1000 avionics fit is an optional upgrade to the cockpit.

Dimensions include an overall length of 27 feet, a wingspan measuring 36 feet, and a height of 8.10 feet.




Media





In the Cockpit
General Assessment
Firepower  
Performance  
Survivability  
Versatility  
Impact  


Values are derrived from a variety of categories related to the design, overall function, and historical influence of this aircraft in aviation history.
MF Power Rating
74
The MF Power Rating takes into account over 60 individual factors related to this aircraft entry. The rating is out of 100 total possible points.
Relative Maximum Speed
Hi: 200mph
Lo: 100mph
This entry's maximum listed speed (186mph).

Graph average of 150 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
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Graph showcases the Cessna 172's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production (44,000)
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
44000
44000

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.


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