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Panzerfaust 30

Disposable Anti-Tank Rocket Launcher

Panzerfaust 30

Disposable Anti-Tank Rocket Launcher

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
VARIANTS
HISTORY
IMAGES
OVERVIEW



The Panzerfaust 30 was an ingenious German disposable anti-tank rocket-launching system of World War 2.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Nazi Germany
YEAR: 1943
MANUFACTURER(S): Various - Germany
OPERATORS: Nazi Germany; Finland; Soviet Union
National flag of Finland
FIN
National flag of Germany
GER
National flag of Nazi Germany
GER
National flag of Soviet Union
USSR
SPECIFICATIONS



Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible. * Calibers listed may be model/chambering dependent.
ACTION: Propellant-Launched Rocket; Single Use Tube
CALIBER(S)*: 100mm; 149mm
SIGHTS: Flip-up Sight
ADVERTISEMENTS
LENGTH (O/A)

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inches
BARREL LGTH

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inches
WEIGHT

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pounds
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kilograms
RATE-OF-FIRE

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rpm
RANGE (EFF)

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feet
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Meters
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Yards
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Panzerfaust 30 (klein) - 100mm projectile; 30 meter range.
• Panzerfaust 30 - 149mm projectile; 30 meter range.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Panzerfaust 30 Disposable Anti-Tank Rocket Launcher.  Entry last updated on 2/26/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Panzerfaust series of hand-held disposable anti-tank rocket systems was a highly-feared adversary to American tank and vehicle crews. The large caliber projectile could defeat any level of armor available to Allied crews and the system as a whole could be quickly produced - appearing in large numbers from 1943 up through the last months of World War 2.

The Panzerfaust was an ingenious design, providing the firer little more than flip-up leaf sights and a firing-ready disposable tube. The operator need only to aim at the target with the launcher tucked under his arm (to protect from the projectiles exhaust) and fire the weapon. The destructive power of the projectile would usually render Allied armor ineffective or damaged for the remainder of the engagement. Such was the crippling power of the Panzerfaust that Allied tank and vehicle crews took steps to defeat the penetration power by applying makeshift armor protection. German infantry were almost exclusively fielded with the system, sometimes in lieu of a primary rifle, when defending territory.

If the Panzerfaust maintained any deficiencies they lay in the rather-infant stage of strategic thinking when fielding a weapon of this type. Range of early Panzerfaust systems was limited to about 30 meters with future systems becoming progressively more versatile. The effective range was indicated in the designation, hence the Panzerfaust 30, Panzerfaust 60 and the Panzerfaust 100. The initial Panzerfaust became the Panzerfaust 30 "klein", to which Klein indicated "small" as in the size of the projectile (these fielded with 100mm types). The second Panzerfaust 30 system utilized a 150mm projectile and appeared soon after the first. The consecutively larger Panzerfaust 60 and Panzerfaust 100 systems fielded the same 150mm projectile but had increased range.




Plans and testing were already underway for the Panzerfaust 150 and Panzerfaust 200 series systems which would have allowed for a reusable firing tube as opposed to the previous series' disposable types. Additionally, range was to be increased thanks to added amounts of propellant for the rocket grenades. In the end, however, these two systems ran out of time with the fall of Germany in 1945.

An effective weapon, considering the ease of use, ease of production in great quantity and the lethality of the projectile, the Panzerfaust was the German infantryman weapon of choice when defending against Allied armor. The drawbacks of limited range was certainly a feature worth noting, as was the use of a disposable firing tube - an act that use up and permanently discarded some much needed German production resources that would never be recouped.






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