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BMW R4

Light Military Motorcycle

BMW R4

Light Military Motorcycle

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The BMW R4 series motorcycles began the relationship between the Nazi German military of World War 2 and the storied company.
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ORIGIN: Nazi Germany
YEAR: 1932
MANUFACTURER(S): BMW - Nazi Germany
PRODUCTION: 15,300
OPERATORS: Nazi Germany
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the BMW R4 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 6.56 feet (2 meters)
WIDTH: 2.95 feet (0.9 meters)
HEIGHT: 3.12 feet (0.95 meters)
WEIGHT: 0 Tons (140 kilograms; 309 pounds)
ENGINE: 1 x 1-cylinder, 4-stroke 398cc engine developing 12 horsepower at 3,500rpm.
SPEED: 68 miles-per-hour (110 kilometers-per-hour)
RANGE: 155 miles (250 kilometers)




ARMAMENT



None.

Ammunition:
Not Applicable.
NBC PROTECTION: None.
NIGHTVISION: None.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• R4 - Base Series Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the BMW R4 Light Military Motorcycle.  Entry last updated on 11/7/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The BMW R4 series was provided to the rebuilding Nazi German Army of World War 2 (1939-1945) as early as 1932. The motorcycles used in the war mainly fulfilled the dispatch role and various accessories could be added to further increase the tactical value of such machines. Many Wehrmacht solders trained on R4 models prior to the war and the type became an instant classic. Based on the original civilian market design, the R4 differed in incorporating a skid plate and different brackets for its saddlebags. The skid pans protected the small engine.

In practice, as well liked as the series was, it suffered from being underpowered but were nonetheless considered reliable machines - retaining nearly all qualities of their civilian counterparts.

The R4 series was succeeded by the BMW R12 of 1935 which was offered with sidecar and produced in large quantities with a more powerful engine.




MEDIA