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AMX-40

Main Battle Tank (MBT)

AMX-40

Main Battle Tank (MBT)

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The export-minded AMX-40 Main Battle Tank failed to net any global orders and was formally cancelled by 1990.
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ORIGIN: France
YEAR: 1986
MANUFACTURER(S): AMX - France
PRODUCTION: 4
OPERATORS: None.
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the AMX-40 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 4
LENGTH: 32.94 feet (10.04 meters)
WIDTH: 11.02 feet (3.36 meters)
HEIGHT: 10.10 feet (3.08 meters)
WEIGHT: 47 Tons (43,000 kilograms; 94,799 pounds)
ENGINE: 1 x Poyaud 12-cylinder diesel engine developing 1,100 horsepower.
SPEED: 43 miles-per-hour (70 kilometers-per-hour)
RANGE: 373 miles (600 kilometers)




ARMAMENT



1 x 120mm smoothbore main gun
1 x 20mm F2 coaxial autocannon
1 x 7.62mm general purpose machine gun at commander's cupola.

Ammunition:
35 x 120mm projectiles
NBC PROTECTION: Yes.
NIGHTVISION: Yes.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• AMX-40 - Base Series Designation; only four prototypes completed; project cancelled by 1990.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the AMX-40 Main Battle Tank (MBT).  Entry last updated on 9/25/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The AMX-40 was an abandoned French main battle tank design intended for export to succeed the equally export-minded AMX-32 series f French-produced tanks. At least four prototypes were constructed during a span from 1983 to 1985. Design of the type began in the early 1980s, eventually yielding the first pilot vehicle in 1983. This was followed a year later by a pair of further prototypes and the final evaluation vehicle was completed in 1985. In theory, the AMX-40 would have provided a cost-effective main battle tank solution that offered firepower, limited protection and above average cross-country performance to those budget-conscious military shoppers. However, limited global market interest eventually doomed the program to zero contract sales with serious interest being generated only by neighboring Spain.

At its core, the AMX-40 was a tank of highly conventional design and configuration. The vehicle was operated by standard a crew of four personnel - the driver, gunner, loader and commander. The driver maintained a front-left hull position while the remaining crew were kept within the traversing turret. The turret was situated at the center of the hull roof and brandished a long, multi-sectioned 120mm main gun barrel. The AMX-40 borrowed the same COTAC fire control system as found on the preceding AMX-30 B2 production models. The design of the turret incorporated sloped armor to help deflect incoming enemy rounds and further protection was offered through the six smoke grenade dischargers (three to a turret side). The AMX-40 sported six road wheels to a track side (one more than the original AMX-32) with the drive sprocket at the rear and the track idler at the front of the hull. The engine was held in a compartment at the rear of the hull for maximum protection. Interestingly, the AMX-40 design featured a co-axially mounted 20mm F2 autocannon as opposed to the more traditional 7.62mm general purpose machine gun fitting found in other Western tanks. A turret roof-mounted 7.62mm machine gun was installed at the commander's cupola to combat low-flying enemy aircraft or enemy infantry. The vehicle's listed weight was 47.38 tons.

Power was supplied by way of a single Poyaud V12X diesel engine developing 1,100 horsepower. This potentially gave the vehicle a top speed of 43 miles per hour with acceptable operational ranges. Armament protection, when initially designed, was actually quite good but advancements in projectile types and anti-tank missiles soon degraded its base value.

The AMX-40 program was officially dropped from the market by 1990.




MEDIA