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de Havilland Super Mosquito


High-Speed Medium Bomber / Fighter-Bomber Proposal (1942)


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Jump-to: Specifications

The de Havilland Super Mosquito was to carry-on the excellent qualities of the earlier DH.98 Mosquito platform.



Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 05/09/2019 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.
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The de Havilland Mosquito went on to become one of the finest warplanes of World War 2 (1939-1945) with its multi-role approach. The two-seat, twin-engined platform excelled as a fighter-bomber, reconnaissance mount and night intruder across many major production marks for its part in the years-long conflict. It was only natural, therefore, that the base design was to be considered for a myriad of other related projects including a dedicated high-speed medium bomber form and a jet-powered fighter offering.

The DH.99 was drawn up to fulfill a fast medium bomber requirement (B.11/41) of 1941, the same specification that drove the competing twin-engined Hawker P.1005. de Havilland engineers concluded that their two-seat heavy fighter could be converted to the high-speed bomber role using the same Napier Sabre IV engines (2,180 horsepower output each) as the proposed P.1005 and built upon the form of the impressive, in-service DH.98 Mosquito design in short order. The evolving project was initially handed the designation of "DH.99" and then this changed to "DH.101". Beyond showcasing slightly larger dimensions, the DH.101 would also carry a complete operating crew of three (as opposed to the Mosquito's two).

Engineers estimated a maximum speed of nearly 420 miles per hour for their new aircraft. 4,000lb of conventional drop stores would be carried internally and an additional 2,000lb would be carried externally (under the wings). External fuel tanks could also be mounted to help increase the bomber's range which would prove helpful over the vast airspaces of Europe, the Pacific and all points in between. In form, the DH.101 mimicked the design lines of the earlier DH.98 quite closely with its sleek fuselage, forward-set wing mainplanes and single-finned tail unit. Each engine would drive a four-bladed propeller unit in contra-rotating fashion, eliminating inherent torque and thusly increasing control and stability. The undercarriage would be of a tail-dragger arrangement and the crew would all sit under a teardrop-shaped canopy just aft of the short nosecone assembly.

As the project progressed, it became apparent that Napier's engine commitments elsewhere in the war would severely restrict availability of the intended Sabre engine for in-development projects like the DH.101. As such, the Bristol Centaurus radial piston engine was selected as a replacement but it was soon realized that this engine fit would play poorly within the design specs required of the de Havilland fast medium bomber - leading to the abandonment of the DH.101.

From the de Havilland drawing boards arrived a new Mosquito development whose dimensions were more in line with the original DH.98. Power would stem from a pair of Rolls-Royce Merlin 61 inline engines. Instead of the design being pushed as a fast medium bomber, the aircraft - designated DH.102 - was slated to succeed the primary DH.98 fighter-bomber marks then in service. It still carried a crew of three but proposed standard armament now centered on 4 x 20mm and 4 x 40mm automatic cannons for a considerable frontal "punch" against ground- and air-based targets alike.

Two DH.102 prototypes were covered under Specification B.4/42 in 1942 but interest in the design soon waned despite the progress showcased in the construction phase. The DH.102 ultimately faced cancellation on December 26th, 1942 and ended all hopes for a Super Mosquito product.

Specifications



Service Year
1942

Origin
United Kingdom national flag graphic
United Kingdom

Status
CANCELLED
Development Ended.
Crew
3

Production
0
UNITS


de Havilland - United Kingdom
National flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom (cancelled)
(OPERATORS list includes past, present, and future operators when applicable)
Air-to-Air Combat, Fighter
General ability to actively engage other aircraft of similar form and function, typically through guns, missiles, and/or aerial rockets.
Interception
Ability to intercept inbound aerial threats by way of high-performance, typically speed and rate-of-climb.
Ground Attack (Bombing, Strafing)
Ability to conduct aerial bombing of ground targets by way of (but not limited to) guns, bombs, missiles, rockets, and the like.
Special-Mission: Anti-Ship
Equipped to search, track, and engage enemy surface elements through visual acquisition, radar support, and onboard weaponry.
X-Plane (Developmental, Prototype, Technology Demonstrator)
Aircraft developed for the role of prototyping, technology demonstration, or research / data collection.


Length
47.6 ft
(14.50 m)
Width/Span
70.0 ft
(21.35 m)
Height
12.8 ft
(3.90 m)
Empty Wgt
24,251 lb
(11,000 kg)
MTOW
33,654 lb
(15,265 kg)
Wgt Diff
+9,403 lb
(+4,265 kg)
(Showcased structural values pertain to the de Havilland D.101 Super Mosquito production variant)
Installed: 2 x Napier Sabre IV liquid-cooled inline piston engines developing 2,180 horsepower each and driving four-bladed propeller units.
Max Speed
416 mph
(670 kph | 362 kts)
Ceiling
29,003 ft
(8,840 m | 5 mi)
Range
1,429 mi
(2,300 km | 4,260 nm)
Rate-of-Climb
3,000 ft/min
(914 m/min)


♦ MACH Regime (Sonic)
Sub
Trans
Super
Hyper
HiHyper
ReEntry
RANGES (MPH) Subsonic: <614mph | Transonic: 614-921 | Supersonic: 921-3836 | Hypersonic: 3836-7673 | Hi-Hypersonic: 7673-19180 | Reentry: >19030


(Showcased performance specifications pertain to the de Havilland D.101 Super Mosquito production variant. Compare this aircraft entry against any other in our database. View aircraft by powerplant type)
PROPOSED (DH.102):
4 x 20mm automatic cannons.
4 x 40mm automatic cannons.

OPTIONAL (DH.98 / DH.101):
6 x 500lb conventional drop bombs OR 4 x 1,000lb bombs OR 2 x 1,900lb bombs held internally.

Up to 2,000lb of conventional drop stores carried externally. Assumed support for aerial rockets and possibly torpedo armament.


Supported Types


Graphical image of an aircraft automatic cannon
Graphical image of aircraft aerial rockets
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Graphical image of an aircraft aerial torpedo


(Not all ordnance types may be represented in the showcase above)
Hardpoint Mountings: 2


"Super Mosquito" - Base Series Name
DH.99 - Original project designation
DH.101 - Revised project designation; medium fast bomber design; increased dimensions; 8,000lb internal/external bombload.
DH.102 - Revised project designation; fighter-bomber design; reduced dimensions; 2 x Rolls-Royce Merlin 61 inline engines; 4 x 20mm and 4 x 40mm automatic cannon armament.


General Assessment
Firepower  
Performance  
Survivability  
Versatility  
Impact  


Values are derrived from a variety of categories related to the design, overall function, and historical influence of this aircraft in aviation history.
Overall Rating
The overall rating takes into account over 60 individual factors related to this aircraft entry.
74
Rating is out of a possible 100 points.
Relative Maximum Speed
Hi: 500mph
Lo: 250mph
This entry's maximum listed speed (416mph).

Graph average of 375 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LON
LON
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MOS
MOS
 
  TOK
TOK
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
de Havilland D.101 Super Mosquito operational range when compared to distances between major cities (in KM).
Max Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Design Balance
The 3 qualities we look at for a balanced aircraft design are altitude, speed, and range.
Aviation Era Span
Pie graph section
Showcasing era cross-over of this aircraft design.
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