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Lohner B.VII

Austria-Hungary (1915)
Picture of Lohner B.VII Reconnaissance Fighter / Light Bomber

The Lohner B.VII was the unarmed version of the Lohner reconnaissance planes that included the armed C.I.


Detailing the development and operational history of the Lohner B.VII Reconnaissance Fighter / Light Bomber.  Entry last updated on 4/11/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com

The Lohner B.VII was a two-seat reconnaissance aircraft produced by and for the Austro-Hungarian Empire during World War 1. While a pre-war military design at its core, the B.VII became the definitive combat-worthy form of the series and was utilized for a time beginning in August of 1915. From there, the aircraft was revised into a more powerful (and ultimately armed) form as the Lohner C.I. These two Lohner designs exhibited healthy operating ranges but were eventually outclassed by the latest crop of fighters entering the airstream by 1917.

Design of the original Lohner B.I series began before the hostilities of World War 1 broke out across Europe, this by the Jakob Lohner AG firm. The B.I was an unarmed reconnaissance platform with seating for two, swept-back biplane wings and a 90 horsepower Austro-Daimler engine. Not wholly satisfied with the performance of the B.I, Jakob Lohner and his team devised successfully progressive and more powerful forms of the B.I that became the B.II, B.III, B.IV, B.V and ultimately the B.VI. It was not under the development of the definitive B.VII that this Lohner aircraft series finally came into its own.

The Lohner B.VII took on a distinct planform. Like those Lohner designs before it, the B.VII featured swept back biplane wings with double bays and parallel struts. These were staggered and fitted above and ahead of the pilot with the lower wing assembly showcasing dihedral (upward angle). The large liquid-cooled engine obstructed some of the forward view and powered a two-blade propeller. The observer/gunner sat in the separated rear portion of the open air cockpit (the two personnel were seated in tandem) and was the trained lookout doubling as a machine gunner if the aircraft was armed as such. The fuselage, with its straight-faced sides, tapered off into a conventional empennage with large-area horizontal planes (also featuring sweep back) and a single vertical tail fin. The undercarriage was traditional of the times and fitted two main landing gear wheels on braced struts along the forward underside of the fuselage coupled with a simple tail skid at the extreme aft-end of the tail. Interestingly, the Lohner aircraft could sport an internal bomb payload of up to 180lbs.

Lohner produced two versions of this reconnaissance plane - the B.VII and the C.I. The B.VII was the (generally) unarmed model and fitted with either a 150- or 160-horsepower Austro-Daimler engine to which 73 of the type were produced (while categorized as unarmed, some B.VIIs did fit a trainable machine gun in the rear cockpit). The C.I represented the "official" armed version, this fitting a single machine gun on a flexible mounting in the rear cockpit for the observer/gunner. The C.I was assigned an Austro-Daimler 6-cylinder inline liquid-cooled engine of 160 horsepower under an engine cowling (the B.VII showcased an exposed engine and no engine cowl) and built to the tune of some 40 examples.

The B.VII sported a wingspan of 50 feet, 6 inches. Endurance was a reported 6 hours in the air while a rate-of-climb of 350 feet-per-minute was possible. The B.VII entered service in 1915. As the B.VII showcased generally excellent endurance for an aircraft of the Great War, this translated to fine long-range service and proving adept at scanning the fronts across Italy. Its bombload did involve the aircraft in occasional strike missions as needed, against both ground-based structures and naval vessels in the region. The armed C.I entered into service with the Austro-Hungarian Empire a short time later in 1916.

By 1917, both Lohner reconnaissance types were removed from frontline service and had their production lines reassessed. All aircraft were produced by Lohner (some C.Is were also manufactured by Ufag) in Austria-Hungary for the Imperial and Royal Aviation Troops.

Any available statistics for the Lohner B.VII Reconnaissance Fighter / Light Bomber are showcased in the areas immediately below. Categories include basic specifications covering country-of-origin, operational status, manufacture(s) and total quantitative production. Other qualities showcased are related to structural values (namely dimensions), installed power and standard day performance figures, installed or proposed armament and mission equipment (if any), global users (from A-to-Z) and series model variants (if any).






Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 100mph
Lo: 50mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (85mph).

    Graph average of 75 miles-per-hour.
Relative Operational Ranges
NYC
 
  LON
LON
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MOS
MOS
 
  TOK
TOK
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Lohner B.VII's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era Impact
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
73
73


  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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National Flag Graphic
National Origin: Austria-Hungary
Service Year: 1915
Classification Type: Reconnaissance Fighter / Light Bomber
Manufacturer(s): Lohner - Vienna
Production Units: 73
Global Operators:
Austria-Hungary
Measurements and Weights icon
Structural - Crew, Dimensions, and Weights:
Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Lohner B.VII model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.

Operational
CREW


Personnel
2


Dimension
LENGTH


Feet
31.17 ft


Meters
9.5 m


Dimension
WIDTH


Feet
50.52 ft


Meters
15.4 m


Dimension
HEIGHT


Feet
12.30 ft


Meters
3.75 m


Weight
EMPTY


Pounds
2,013 lb


Kilograms
913 kg


Weight
LOADED


Pounds
2,998 lb


Kilograms
1,360 kg

Engine icon
Installed Power - Standard Day Performance:
1 x Austro-Daimler inline engine developing 150 horsepower.

Performance
SPEED


Miles-per-Hour
85 mph


Kilometers-per-Hour
137 kph


Knots
74 kts


Performance
RANGE


Miles
112 mi


Kilometers
180 km


Nautical Miles
97 nm


Performance
CEILING


Feet
11,483 ft


Meters
3,500 m


Miles
2.17 mi


Performance
CLIMB RATE


Feet-per-Minute
350 ft/min


Meters-per-Minute
107 m/min

Armament - Hardpoints (0):

OPTIONAL:
Up to 180 lb of conventional drop ordnance.
Supported Weapon Systems:

Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Variants: Series Model Variants
• B.I - Early War Model; unarmed
• B.II - Differing engine
• B.III - Differing engine
• B.IV - Differing engine
• B.V - Differing engine
• B.VI - Differing engine
• B.VII - Unarmed Model; fitted with Austro-Daimler engine of 150 or 160 horsepower; 73 examples produced; appearing August 1915.
• C.I - Fitted with Austro-Daimler engine of 160 horsepowwer; armed with 1 x machine gun in rear cockpit (trainable mounting); engine cowling; 40 examples produced; appearing 1916.