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Aeromarine 39

Naval Trainer Biplane Aircraft

Aeromarine 39

Naval Trainer Biplane Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Aeromarine 39 became the first American aircraft to land on a moving carrier in 1922.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1917
STATUS: Retired, Out-of-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Aeromarine Plane and Motor Company - USA
PRODUCTION: 150
OPERATORS: China; United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Aeromarine 39 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 30.35 feet (9.25 meters)
WIDTH: 46.98 feet (14.32 meters)
HEIGHT: 14.76 feet (4.5 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 1,940 pounds (880 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 2,504 pounds (1,136 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Hall Scott A-7 piston engine developing 100 horsepower.
SPEED (MAX): 73 miles-per-hour (117 kilometers-per-hour; 63 knots)
RANGE: 273 miles (439 kilometers; 237 nautical miles)
CEILING: 8,202 feet (2,500 meters; 1.55 miles)




ARMAMENT



None.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Aeromarine Model 39A - Twin-Float Seaplane; fitted with 1 x Hall-Scott A-7 engine of 100 horsepower.
• Aeromarine Model 39B - Twin-Float Seaplane; fitted with Curtiss OXX water-cooled V-8 engine; increased wingspan; single-pontoon outrigger floats; enlarged vertical tail.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Aeromarine 39 Naval Trainer Biplane Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 6/21/2018. Authored by JR Potts, AUS 173d AB and Dan Alex. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
In 1917, the United States Navy entered into a contract with the Aeromarine Plane and Motor Company for a new twin-seat biplane trainer aircraft. From the period spanning 1910 to 1924, Aeromarine delivered various aircraft types for civilian and military service - mailplanes, floatplane fighters and night time bombers among the group. With its key location near the Atlantic - its facilities were at Keyport, New Jersey - Aeromarine held perfect access to designing and developing aircraft intended t fly over water. The USN request was met by the Aeromarine 39 design and was eventually used as a land- and water-based trainer. Production totaled 150 aircraft.

The Aeromarine 39's design and construction was highly conventional for the period. It featured a slab-sided fuselage with seating for two in line. Its biplane wing arrangement included an upper and lower wing section, these supported by parallel struts and cabling for strength and control. The engine was fitted at the front of the fuselage in the usual way and drove a two-bladed wooden propeller. The empennage consisted of a single vertical tail gin with its applicable horizontal tailplanes. The undercarriage came in two forms depending on the service needed - for seaborne operations, pontoon floats were featured with a quick-removal capability, allowing a twin-wheeled undercarriage with tailskid arrangement to be used for land-based service of the aircraft.

Of the 150 total aircraft manufactured by Aeromarine, the initial fifty units were outfitted with the Hall-Scott A-7 engine of 100 horsepower (same as on the Standard J-1 trainers) as well as twin floats. These later came to be known as the "Aeromarine 39A" for the line went on to include a revised variant - the Aeromarine 39B. The 39B model held a modified floatplane undercarriage that featured a single pontoon with outboard floats instead. The engine was now switched over to a Curtiss OXX series system of 100 horsepower due to the Hall-Scott's propensity to catch fire. The vertical tail unit was granted more surface area for improved controlling. Dimensions included a length of 9.25 meters, a wingspan of 14.3 meters and a height of 4 meters. Maximum speed was 73 miles per hour with a range of 273 miles and service ceiling up to 8,200 feet.

The Aeromarine 39 soldiered on as time wore on - even into the early interwar years preceding World War 2 (1939-1945) and following World War 1 (1914-1918). World War 1 ended with the Armistice of November 1918, bringing the bloody conflict to a formal close. The Aeromarine 39s in service lived out the rest of their days from then on. Some examples ended in service with the Chinese.

It was during this after-war period that an Aeromarine 39 made American naval history when - On October 26, 1922 - Lieutenant Commander Godfrey deCourcelles Chevalier -piloted his Aeromarine 39 onto the deck of the USS Langley (CV-1/AV-3) as it steamed forward at 10 knots. Chevalier successfully landed his aircraft on the moving vessel - marking the first such landing on an American carrier.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 100mph
Lo: 50mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (73mph).

    Graph average of 75 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
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  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
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  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Aeromarine 39A's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
150
150

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
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Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
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Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.