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Supermarine Walrus (Seagull)

Search and Rescue / Reconnaissance Amphibious Flying Boat Aircraft

Supermarine Walrus (Seagull)

Search and Rescue / Reconnaissance Amphibious Flying Boat Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Supermarine Walrus served with a myriad of British and Commonwealth squadrons and saw approximately 740 examples delivered.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United Kingdom
YEAR: 1935
MANUFACTURER(S): Supermarine - UK
PRODUCTION: 740
OPERATORS: Argentina; Australia; Canada; Egypt; France; Ireland; Netherlands; New Zealand; Norway; Soviet Union; Turkey; United Kingdom
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Supermarine Walrus (Seagull) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 3 or 4
LENGTH: 37.57 feet (11.45 meters)
WIDTH: 45.93 feet (14 meters)
HEIGHT: 15.09 feet (4.6 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 4,894 pounds (2,220 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 8,047 pounds (3,650 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Bristol Pegasus V1 9-cylinder air-cooled radial engine developing 775 horsepower each.
SPEED (MAX): 134 miles-per-hour (215 kilometers-per-hour; 116 knots)
RANGE: 600 miles (965 kilometers; 521 nautical miles)
CEILING: 18,537 feet (5,650 meters; 3.51 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 1,050 feet-per-minute (320 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



STANDARD:
2 OR 3 x 7.7mm Vickers K machine guns.

OPTIONAL:
Up to 6,100lb of ordnance including bombs and depth charges.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Walrus Mk.I - Metal Hull
• Walrus Mk.II - Wood Hull
• Seagull Mk.V - Original Production Model with an all-metal hull for Australian service.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Supermarine Walrus (Seagull) Search and Rescue / Reconnaissance Amphibious Flying Boat Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 10/23/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The flying boat played a crucial role in all theaters of operation during World War 2 (1939-1945). The types offered excellent range and the inherent ability to land and take-off from water sources, providing the needed loitering times and "eyes-in-the-skies" for commanders and warplanners alike. Supermarine, generally remembered for its contribution of the classic "Spitfire" fighter used during the conflict, was a potent flying-boat-maker as well and delivered, for the British and others, a steady stable of such aircraft - many of which saw considerable action during the Second World War.

One of these contributions became the Supermarine "Walrus". The design appeared as a private venture by Supermarine with origins in an Australian Royal Air Force (RAAF) requirement for a relatively compact flying boat able to be supported from existing Australian Navy cruiser warships. Work, led by one R.J. Mitchell, on the aircraft began in 1930 and a flyable prototype was available in 1933. A first flight was recorded on June 21st of that year and series introduction was had in 1935. An amphibious quality was also built into the design which allowed the aircraft to use prepared runaways as needed.

The aircraft was originally known by the name of "Seagull" and this encompassed the original Seagull V production model and its all-metal hull (34 examples were completed). Then came the Walrus Mk.I which retained the metal hull and this was followed by the Walrus Mk.II model and its wooden hull.

The basic design incorporated a raised biplane wing arrangement and this was sat over the dorsal spine of the fuselage. A single engine was fitted between the two planes and over the spine itself to keep it as far away from the water as possible. The cockpit was stepped and positioned at the nose section, ahead of the wing mainplanes. The hull was designed to be boat-like so as to better adhere to water landings and take-offs. The fuselage tapered to the rear and was capped by a single, rounded vertical fin with high-mounted tailplanes fitted. Main landing gear members (wheeled) were positioned along the sides of the hull while a small leg was set under the tail for land-based operation of the aircraft.




Supermarine Walrus (Seagull) (Cont'd)

Search and Rescue / Reconnaissance Amphibious Flying Boat Aircraft

Supermarine Walrus (Seagull) (Cont'd)

Search and Rescue / Reconnaissance Amphibious Flying Boat Aircraft



Dimensionally the aircraft exhibited a length of 37.6 feet with a wingspan of 45.9 feet and a height of 15.2 feet. Empty weight was 5,000lb against a Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) of 8,050lb. Power was from 1 x Bristol Pegasus VI series air-cooled radial piston engine developing 680 horsepower. Maximum speeds reached 135 miles per hour with a range out to 600 miles and a service ceiling up to 18,500 feet. Rate-of-climb was 1,050 feet-per-minute.

Internally, there was a typical operating crew of three to four. Armament included two to three 7.7mm Vickers K machine guns. The bombload totaled 6,100lb of drop ordnance which could be a mix of conventional drop bombs or depth charges.

The Australian Air Force was the first to receive the Seagull / Walrus in useful numbers and this took place in 1935 and the last was delivered in 1937. The British Royal Air Force (RAF) followed as an operator in 1936. Both countries fielded the type from active warships heading into the war.

When World War 2 began in September of 1939, the Walrus series was already an entrenched asset for the British and Commonwealth forces. As such it was immediately placed into direct action and undertook various roles such as maritime reconnaissance, artillery spotting and Search and Rescue (SAR). Walrus aircraft operated in all of the major theaters of the war, such was its versatility. Production spanned from 1936 until 1944 and some 740 total aircraft were produced during that time.

Beyond its wartime service, the Walrus continued flying into the post-war period. The global list of operators included Argentina (military, post-war), Australia (military, civilian), Canada (military, civilian), Egypt (military), France (military, navy), Ireland (Air Corps), Netherlands (civilian), New Zealand (military), Norway (civilian), the Soviet Union (Naval Aviation), Turkey (military, Air Force) and the United Kingdom (military, civilian).




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 150mph
Lo: 75mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (134mph).

    Graph average of 112.5 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Supermarine Walrus Mk.II's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
740
740

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue