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AirCo DH.9

Light Bomber Biplane Aircraft

AirCo DH.9

Light Bomber Biplane Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The planned successor to the Airco DH.4, the Airco DH.9 failed in most respects.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United Kingdom
YEAR: 1917
STATUS: Retired, Out-of-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Aircraft Manufacturing Company Ltd (AirCo) / de Havilland - United Kingdom
PRODUCTION: 4,091
OPERATORS: Afghanistan; Australia; Belgium; Bolivia; Canada; Chile; Denmark; Estonia; Greece; India; Ireland; Latvia; Netherlands; New Zealand; Paraguay; Peru; Poland; Romania; Saudi Arabia (Kingdom of Hejaz); Spain; South Africa; Soviet Union; Switzerland; Turkey; United Kingdom; United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the AirCo DH.9 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 30.41 feet (9.27 meters)
WIDTH: 65.35 feet (19.92 meters)
HEIGHT: 11.29 feet (3.44 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 2,235 pounds (1,014 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 3,799 pounds (1,723 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Armstrong Siddeley Puma water-cooled inline piston engine developing 230 horsepower.
SPEED (MAX): 113 miles-per-hour (182 kilometers-per-hour; 98 knots)
RANGE: 503 miles (810 kilometers; 437 nautical miles)
CEILING: 15,518 feet (4,730 meters; 2.94 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 540 feet-per-minute (165 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



STANDARD:
1 x .303 Vickers machine gun in fixed, forward-firing mounting.
1 OR 2 x .303 Lewis machine gun(s) in rear cockpit position on trainable Scarff ring mounting.

OPTIONAL:
External bomb load up to 460 lb (209 kg).
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• DH.9 - Base production model based on the earlier DH.4 with decreased area between pilot and gunner positions of which over 3,000 produced.
• DH.9A - Improved powerplant
• DH.9B - Civilian Conversion Model to accommodate pilot and two passengers.
• DH.9C - Civilian Conversion Model to accommodate pilot and three passengers.
• DH.9J - Updated powerplant (Armstrong Siddeley Jaguar III radial piston engine generating 385-hp); Pilot trainer.
• DH.9J M'pala I - Conversion for South Africa fitted with Bristol Jupiter VI radial piston engine generating 450hp.
• M'pala II - Conversion model for South Africa fitted with Bristol Jupiter VIII radial piston engine generating 480hp.
• Mantis - Conversion model for South Africa fitted with Wolseley Viper piston engine generating 200hp.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the AirCo DH.9 Light Bomber Biplane Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 5/16/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The AirCo DH.9 was a further revision of the DH.4 bomber - again headed by famous aviation engineer Geoffrey de Havilland. Design of the new aircraft was handled by the de Havilland company with serial production managed through the Aircraft Manufacturing Company, better known under the acronym of "AirCo" or "Airco". The model was first flown in July of 1917 and introduced into service that same year. It managed only a short post-war career as it was retired from notable service in 1920. 4,091 of the type were ultimately produced.

The DH.9 shared a few of the major design qualities found on the preceding DH.4 including the undercarriage, tail unit, and wings. The DH.9 differed from the DH.4 in that it positioned the gunner and pilot closer together to better communications between the two and was fitted with a more powerful engine. The new fuselage was also intended to streamline the aircraft and take away stresses from the engine. Initial tests revealed that the base DH.9 was simply too underpowered and not much of an upgrade over the DH.4 (which it was meant to replace) thus the system was redesigned as the DH.9A. The DH.9A model attempted to address performance issues and defensive drawbacks by incorporating a lengthened wingspan and a fixed forward-firing machine gun for the pilot. A trainable machine gun was found at the rear gunner/observer's cockpit for protecting the aircraft's critical "six" position.

Not a spectacular aircraft in any one regard, the DH.9 managed a rather poor service record in World War 1 with more losses due to mechanical and performance issues than actual enemy fire. Notable deficiencies in the series lay in its limited service ceiling, fuel consumption at altitudes higher than 10,000 feet, and general engine reliability. If there was one role that the DH.9 proved at least somewhat adequate in was in coastal patrol assignments when hunting down German U-boats - there was a reduced chance of running into enemy aircraft or ground-based fire in this role. Though generally inadequate over most fronts, the DH.9 was naturally more successful in poorly defended areas during the course of the war, this to be true in the Middle East Theater over Palestine and also over Macedonia.

The DH.9 series saw some life after the war in the civil transportation market with many countries. Final production of the DH.9 extended into 1920 - the United States manufactured the DH.9 with the help of the Engineering Division and designated the aircraft as "USD-9" (1,415 were produced by the U.S.). An American-produced engine - the 400 horsepower Packard "Liberty" - was used to power these DH.9A models.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 120mph
Lo: 60mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (113mph).

    Graph average of 90 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the AirCo DH.9's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
4091
4091

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
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Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.