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Kondor D.I (Kondorlaus)

Biplane Fighter Prototype Aircraft

Kondor D.I (Kondorlaus)

Biplane Fighter Prototype Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Kondor D.I of German Empire origination failed to meet performance expectations and was redrawn to become the D.II fighter prototype for the company.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Imperial Germany
YEAR: 1917
STATUS: Cancelled
MANUFACTURER(S): Kondor Flugzeugwerke - German Empire
PRODUCTION: 1
OPERATORS: Imperial Germany (cancelled)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Kondor D.I model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 15.91 feet (4.85 meters)
WIDTH: 24.93 feet (7.6 meters)
HEIGHT: 7.87 feet (2.4 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 860 pounds (390 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 1,257 pounds (570 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Gnome-Monosoupape rotary engine developing 100 horsepower and driving a two-bladed wooden propeller at the nose.




ARMAMENT



PROPOSED:
2 x 7.92mm LMG 08/15 machine guns synchronized to fire through the spinning propeller blades.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• D.I ("Kondorlaus") - Base Prototype Name; single example completed.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Kondor D.I (Kondorlaus) Biplane Fighter Prototype Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 5/10/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Kondor D.I (unofficially named the "Kondorlaus") was a twin-gunned, single-seat prototype biplane fighter developed by the German Empire concern of Kondor Flugzeugwerke during World War 1 (1914-1918). The aircraft was developed alongside Kondor's other offering, the triplane-equipped "Dreidecker". Tested in 1917, the D.I was found to be lacking performance and was eventually evolved into the D.II prototype by the company. The designs were credited to Walter Rethel and Paul G. Ehrhardt.

The biplane wing arrangement in the D.I was of unequal span, meaning that the upper section was longer in span than the lower. A single bay was set to each side of the fuselage and V-type struts added strength to each wing element (as did the usual cabling). The fuselage held the engine at the nose in typical fashion, a single-seat open-air cockpit, and a tapered aft-end. The tail unit was conventional with its single vertical plane and low-set horizontal planes. The undercarriage was of the typical "tail-dragger" type for ground-running. Power was supplied by a single Gnome-Monosoupape rotary engine developing 100 horsepower and driving a two-bladed propeller unit at the nose. Proposed armament for the fighter was to become 2 x 7.92mm LMG 08/15 machine guns with up to 500 rounds of ammunition carried aboard.

As built, the D.I has an empty weight of 855lb with a loaded weight of 1,255lb. Length was 15.10 feet with a wingspan of 24.11 feet and a height of 7.10 feet.

In Autumn of 1917, the aircraft was put through its paces through the requisite trials but was soon found to be an underperforming machine, resulting in the D.I being taken back to the drawing boards and reemerging to become the Kondor D.II (detailed elsewhere on this site).




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1
1

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
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Commitments / Honors
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Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
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Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
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Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
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Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.