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Republic XP-69

High-Speed, High-Altitude Single-Seat Fighter Concept

Republic XP-69

High-Speed, High-Altitude Single-Seat Fighter Concept

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Republic XP-69 fighter project was doomed with the demise of the Wright Tornado engine program in 1943.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1943
STATUS: Cancelled
MANUFACTURER(S): Republic Aviation Corporation - USA
PRODUCTION: 0
OPERATORS: United States (cancelled)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Republic XP-69 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 36.58 feet (11.15 meters)
WIDTH: 40.85 feet (12.45 meters)
HEIGHT: 15.91 feet (4.85 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 11,497 pounds (5,215 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 17,637 pounds (8,000 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Wright R-2160-3 Tornado 42-cylinder turbosupercharged engine developing up to 2,500 horsepower.
SPEED (MAX): 466 miles-per-hour (750 kilometers-per-hour; 405 knots)
RANGE: 994 miles (1,600 kilometers; 864 nautical miles)
CEILING: 41,995 feet (12,800 meters; 7.95 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 4,500 feet-per-minute (1,372 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



PROPOSED:
2 x 37mm automatic cannons in wings (one to a wing).
4 x 0.50 caliber Browning heavy machine guns in wings (two to a wing).
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• XP-69 - Base Project Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Republic XP-69 High-Speed, High-Altitude Single-Seat Fighter Concept.  Entry last updated on 7/13/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
Republic struck wartime gold with its successful P-47 "Thunderbolt" fighter. The Thunderbolt went down in American aviation lore as one of the classic designs to come out of the World War 2 period (1939-1945). It, along with a healthy stable of competing designs, helped to swing back the initiative in the air wars over Europe and the Pacific, leading to an ultimate resolution in the years-long conflict come 1945.

The P-47 was so critical to American wartime needs that it left little room for Republic to work on other promising ventures. Despite this, several projects were underway with the task of fulfilling various over-battlefield roles and, in July of 1941, the company pursued a new single-seat / single-engine high-altitude, high-speed fighter design in the "AP-18" and this performance aircraft was to fit either the in-development Wright "Tornado" or the Pratt & Whitney "Wasp Major" engine. The Tornado seemingly held the edge in terms of timetable and was backed by the Army since a contract was given in June of 1939.

To field the engine in a fighter form as quickly as possible, the Army contracted with Republic to produce an appropriate aircraft in short order. A pair of prototypes would be covered in the agreement with one showcasing a single propeller fit and another completed with a contra-rotating propeller. The Tornado engine was estimated to have an output of 2,500 horsepower with turbosupercharger installed but this also required a propeller unit with considerable diameter. In turn this would require a dimensionally large airframe and, to satisfy the high-altitude requirement, a pressurized cockpit was a must.

The proposed armament suit would revolve around a battery of 4 x 0.50 caliber Browning heavy machine guns paired with 2 x 37mm automatic cannons. All armament would be held in the wings so as to clear the arc of the spinning propeller blades at the nose.

The fuselage incorporated a slim, narrow appearance for aerodynamic efficiency. The early version had a raised dorsal spine which restricted rearward views while a later, more refined approach, incorporated a bubble-style canopy (as in late-P47 fighters). The wing mainplanes, with rounded tips as in the P-47, were set well-ahead of midships. The tail unit was conventional and settled on a single vertical fin with low-set planes. The undercarriage was to use a "tail-dragger" stance. It is suspected that the engine would have been placed aft of the cockpit to drive the propeller by way of a shaft running under the cockpit floor (as in the Bell P-39).

A wind tunnel model was constructed at three-quarter size of the expected aircraft and officially inspected by Army personnel in June of 1942. Republic began construction of the actual prototype by November of that year but, in 1943, continuing issues with the Tornado engine program affected all related aircraft programs like the XP-69 and Vultee's XP-68 proposal. Its eventual cancellation led to the cancellations of both fighter programs with nothing but a wind tunnel model and partially-built XP-69 prototype to show for Republic.

The XP-69 was officially cancelled on May 24th, 1943 and Republic moved on to more P-47 production and additional development as well as development of the promising XP-72 "Ultrabolt" which could possibly meet the same over-battlefield need as the proposed XP-69. In any event, the XP-72 did not see formal adoption nor serial production.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 500mph
Lo: 250mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (466mph).

    Graph average of 375 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
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  TKY
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  SYD
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  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Republic XP-69's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Pie graph section
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Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
0
0

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
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Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
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