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Beech AT-10 Wichita

Twin-Engine Military Trainer Aircraft

Beech AT-10 Wichita

Twin-Engine Military Trainer Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



Nearly 2,400 Beechcraft AT-10 Wichita aircraft were built from 1942 to 1944 for the United States Army Air Forces of World War 2.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1942
MANUFACTURER(S): Beechcraft / Beech Aircraft / Globe Aircraft - USA
PRODUCTION: 2,371
OPERATORS: United States (retired)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Beech AT-10 Wichita model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 34.32 feet (10.46 meters)
WIDTH: 43.96 feet (13.4 meters)
HEIGHT: 10.33 feet (3.15 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 4,751 pounds (2,155 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 6,129 pounds (2,780 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Lycoming R-680-9 air-cooled radial piston engines developing 295 horsepower each.
SPEED (MAX): 199 miles-per-hour (320 kilometers-per-hour; 173 knots)
RANGE: 771 miles (1,240 kilometers; 670 nautical miles)
CEILING: 16,896 feet (5,150 meters; 3.20 miles)




ARMAMENT



None.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Model 25 - Beechcraft product model; lost to accident
• Model 26 - Subsequent Beechcraft product model
• AT-10 - USAAF designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Beech AT-10 Wichita Twin-Engine Military Trainer Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 2/3/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Beech Aircraft AT-10 "Wichita" was conceived by the company as a dedicated, low-cost twin-engine military trainer to meet a standing requirement by the United States Army Air Corps (USAAC) (to become the United States Army Air Forces - USAAF - in March of 1942). To facilitate mass production (and head-off a possible shortage of valuable aluminum during wartime), plywood was used throughout the construction of the airframe with metal only applied to the key sections such as the engine and cockpit area. The Wichita, beginning life as the company "Model 25", saw design from 1940 until 1941 and entered service in 1942. The AT-10 was named after the Kansan town of "Wichita" where the Beechcraft facility resided and 2,371 total examples followed with manufacturing handled by Beechcraft (1,771 units) and Globe Aircraft Corporation (600 units).

The original prototype was lost to an accident on May 5th, 1941 during testing by the USAAC and Beechcraft quickly turned around and constructed a second form as the "Model 26". Following the requisite evaluations, trials and certifications, the aircraft was adopted as the AT-10 and entered the USAAC inventory in February of 1942. Nearly 750 were on hand before the end of the year.

Dimensions of the Wichita included a length of 34.3 feet, a wingspan of 44 feet and a height of 10.3 feet. Empty was 4,750 lb with a Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) nearing 6,130 lb. The Wichita was powered by a pair of Lycoming R-680-9 series air-cooled engines delivering 295 horsepower apiece. This propelled the aircraft to speeds of 198 miles per hour out to ranges of 770 miles and a service ceiling up to 16,900 feet.

The AT-10 proved crucial in the training of airmen intended for large aircraft as it stood as a stepping stone to operational-level bombers and transport types of equal or larger size. Production of the series was aided by its simplicity - the largely wooden approach allowed Beechcraft to outsource manufacture to wood-working / furniture plants to help meet demand. Even the all-important fuel stores were wooden with a synthetic rubber liner applied. The aircraft was in constant production until 1944 and the final examples emerged from Globe Aircraft lines (the company evolving to become Temco in the post-war period).

AT-10s operated until the end of the war which arrived in 1945.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 200mph
Lo: 100mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (199mph).

    Graph average of 150 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
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  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Beech AT-10 Wichita's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
2371
2371

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
In the Cockpit...
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.