×
Aircraft / Aviation Vehicles & Artillery Infantry Arms Warships & Submarines Military Pay Scale Military Ranks
Advertisements

HOME
INFANTRY
MODERN ARMIES
SPECIAL FORCES
COUNTRIES
MANUFACTURERS
COMPARE
BY CONFLICT
BY TYPE
BY DECADE

Gatling Model 1861


Battlefield Support Weapon (1861)


Infantry Small Arms / The Warfighter

1 / 12
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
2 / 12
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
3 / 12
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
4 / 12
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
5 / 12
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
6 / 12
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
7 / 12
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
8 / 12
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
9 / 12
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
10 / 12
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
11 / 12
Left side view of a Gatling Gun with ammunition carriage attached
12 / 12
Front right side view of a Gatling Gun on display; color

Jump-to: Specifications

Ironically, Dr. Gatling originally designed his Gatling Gun for the purpose of reducing the size of modern armies and, in turn, reducing the number of battlefield deaths.



Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 09/12/2016 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.
Advertisements
Richard Gatling patented his ferocious weapon in the early 1860s and the type was subsequently used in the American Civil War to deadly effect. The basic principle revolved around a steady feed of ammunition supplied to ten rotating barrels to help prevent the barrels from overheating. Rotation of the barrels were hand-cranked by the operator/aimer. A second soldier would insert a fresh forty-round magazine into the top of the weapon as needed. Magazines were fed from a large vertical "hopper".

Gatling guns came in a variety of calibers following the Civil War and these included the .45, .50 and even a 1-inch caliber. Despite its impressive 350-to-400 rounds per minute rate-of-fire, such an instrument was none-the-less prone to jamming.

Transportation was provided for by two large, multi-spoked wheels to either side of the weapon. The wheels were attached to an axle which also served as the base mounting for the gun itself. A tow system at the rear of the gun allowed connection to another two-wheeled axle system carrying ammunition supply boxes. The entire unit could then be carted by horse or pack mules as needed.

Despite its potential, the Gatling Gun saw little action along the Western Frontier in post-war America. Teddy Roosevelt's Rough Riders made use of no fewer than four Gatling Guns in their battle up San Juan Hill in Puerto Rico, resulting in an American/Cuban victory over the Kingdom of Spain. Gatling Guns also defended Fort Davis in Texas for a time, these being Model 1865 versions firing new rimfire copper-based cartridges.

Specifications



Service Year
1861

Origin
United States national flag graphic
United States

Classification


Battlefield Support Weapon


Dr. Richard J. Gatling - USA
National flag of the United States United States
(OPERATORS list includes past, present, and future operators when applicable)
Fire Support
Capable of suppressing enemy elements at range through direct or in-direct fire.
Special Purpose
Special purpose weapon for a specially defined battlefield role.


Action


Hand-Cranked Rotating Action; Simultaneous Feed

(Material presented above is for historical and entertainment value and should not be construed as usable for hardware restoration, maintenance, or general operation - always consult official manufacturer sources for such information)


Caliber(s)*


.45/70

Rounds / Feed


40-round magazines fed simultaneously
Cartridge relative size chart
*May not represent an exhuastive list; calibers are model-specific dependent, always consult official manufacturer sources.
**Graphics not to actual size; not all cartridges may be represented visually; graphics intended for general reference only.
Rate-of-Fire
400
rds/min


Gatling Gun - Base Series Name
Model 1861
Model 1865 - Rimfire copper-based cartridges; adopted in 1866.
Model 1881


Military lapel ribbon for the American Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2


Ribbon graphics not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns / operations.

Advertisements





Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Cookies


2022 Military Pay Scale Army Ranks Navy Ranks Air Force Ranks Alphabet Code DoD Dictionary American War Deaths French Military Victories Vietnam War Casualties

The "Military Factory" name and MilitaryFactory.com logo are registered ® U.S. trademarks protected by all applicable domestic and international intellectual property laws. All written content, illustrations, and photography are unique to this website (unless where indicated) and not for reuse/reproduction in any form. Material presented throughout this website is for historical and entertainment value only and should not to be construed as usable for hardware restoration, maintenance, or general operation. We do not sell any of the items showcased on this site. Please direct all other inquiries to militaryfactory AT gmail.com.

Part of a network of sites that includes GlobalFirepower, a data-driven property used in ranking the top military powers of the world, WDMMA.org, the World Directory of Modern Military Aircraft, and SR71blackbird.org, detailing the history of the world's most iconic spyplane.


Facebook Logo YouTube Logo

www.MilitaryFactory.com • All Rights Reserved • Content ©2003-