×
Aircraft / Aviation Vehicles & Artillery Infantry Arms Warships & Submarines Military Pay Chart (2023) Military Ranks
Advertisements

HOME
INFANTRY
MODERN ARMIES
SPECIAL FORCES
COUNTRIES
MANUFACTURERS
COMPARE
BY CONFLICT
BY TYPE
BY DECADE
INTERWAR PERIOD
WORLD WAR 1

Infantry Small Arms / The Warfighter


Huot Automatic Rifle


Light Machine Gun (LMG) [ 1918 ]



The Huot Automatic Rifle was a Canadian World War 1 attempt at reutilizing reserve stocks of Ross Rifle bolt-action guns.



Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 09/15/2022 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

GO TO SPECIFICATIONS [+]
Advertisements
The "Huot Automatic Rifle" Light Machine Gun (LMG) was a Canadian product of the World War 1 (1914-1918) period. The type was devised from surplus stocks of straight-pull bolt-action "Ross Rifles" (detailed elsewhere on this site) which were superseded in the Canadian Army inventory by the British Enfield SMLE bolt-action rifle. This led Canadian engineer Joseph Huot to develop the Ross Mark III into a working automatic rifle form (the gun would eventually bear his name).

The resulting design was a cumbersome form melding the original Ross Rifle with the characteristics of a then-modern automatic weapon system. The wooden body (shoulder stock included) was retained and a cylindrical ammunition drum was affixed under the frame. Over the frame was a large sheet-steel cylinder shrouding the barrel and working components (which included the Ross Rifle's original straight-pull bolt-action arrangement). Parallel to the barrel was installed the gas-operated piston for the needed automatic actions. The weapon was actuated in typical fashion, a single trigger seated under the rifle's body.

The LMG was chambered for the proven .303 British rifle cartridge.

Design work took place in 1916 as the World War raged on and very-limited production was had between the years 1917 and 1918 resulting in about four or five serial examples. Regarded as cheaper-to-produce than the competing American "Lewis Gun", the promising Canadian creation was tested extensively at Hythe and Enfield with generally good results for what would have been a much-needed wartime product. However, the war ended in November of 1918 with the Armistice, bringing about a formal end to development of this Light Machine Gun.

Rate-of-fire reached 475 rounds-per-minute and feeding was by way of 25-round detachable drum magazine. Sighting of the weapon was through a front and rear iron arrangement.
Advertisements

Specifications



Service Year
1918

Origin
Canada national flag graphic
Canada

Classification


Light Machine Gun (LMG)


Joseph Alphonse Huot - Canada
(View other Arms-Related Manufacturers)
National flag of Canada Canada (trialed)
(OPERATORS list includes past, present, and future operators when applicable)
Fire Support
Capable of suppressing enemy elements at range through direct or in-direct fire.


Overall Length
1,195 mm
47.05 in
Barrel Length
635 mm
25.00 in
Empty Wgt
13.01 lb
5.90 kg
Sights


Iron Front and Rear.


Action


Gas-Operated, Automatic Fire.

Gas-Operated
Gas-operated system is featured, typically involving a gas cylinder and rear-driven piston directing energy to the bolt component.
(Material presented above is for historical and entertainment value and should not be construed as usable for hardware restoration, maintenance, or general operation - always consult official manufacturer sources for such information)


Caliber(s)*


.303 British

Rounds / Feed


25-round detachable drum magazine.
Cartridge relative size chart
*May not represent an exhuastive list; calibers are model-specific dependent, always consult official manufacturer sources.
**Graphics not to actual size; not all cartridges may be represented visually; graphics intended for general reference only.
Rate-of-Fire
475
rds/min


Huot Automatic Rifle - Base Series Name; only prototypes completed.


Military lapel ribbon for the American Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Ukranian-Russian War
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2


Ribbon graphics not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns / operations.

Images Gallery



1 / 1
Image from the Public Domain.


Advertisements







Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Cookies


2023 Military Pay Chart Military Ranks DoD Dictionary Conversion Calculators Military Alphabet Code Military Map Symbols

The "Military Factory" name and MilitaryFactory.com logo are registered ® U.S. trademarks protected by all applicable domestic and international intellectual property laws. All written content, illustrations, and photography are unique to this website (unless where indicated) and not for reuse/reproduction in any form. Material presented throughout this website is for historical and entertainment value only and should not to be construed as usable for hardware restoration, maintenance, or general operation. We do not sell any of the items showcased on this site. Please direct all other inquiries to militaryfactory AT gmail.com.

Part of a network of sites that includes GlobalFirepower, a data-driven property used in ranking the top military powers of the world, WDMMA.org (World Directory of Modern Military Aircraft), WDMMW.org (World Directory of Modern Military Warships), SR71blackbird.org, detailing the history of the world's most iconic spyplane, and MilitaryRibbons.info, cataloguing all American military medals and ribbons.


www.MilitaryFactory.com • All Rights Reserved • Content ©2003-