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Model 1914 Stick Grenade


Concussion / Fragmentation Grenade


Russia | 1914



"The Model 1914, an evolution of the earlier Model 1912, was used by Russian and Soviet forces in World War 1 and World War 2, respectively."

Performance
Performance specifications presented assume optimal operating conditions for the Model 1914 Stick Grenade. Information presented is strictly for general reference and should not be misconstrued as useful for hardware restoration or operation.
1
Rounds-Per-Minute
Rate-of-Fire
Physical
The physical qualities of the Model 1914 Stick Grenade. Information presented is strictly for general reference and should not be misconstrued as useful for hardware restoration or operation.
235 mm
9.25 in
O/A Length
235 mm
9.25 in
Barrel Length
1.10 lb
0.50 kg
Weight
Safety Pin; Timed-Fuze
Action
Not Applicable.
Caliber(s)
Single-Use.
Feed
Not Applicable.
Sights
Variants
Notable series variants as part of the Model 1914 Stick Grenade Concussion / Fragmentation Grenade family line.
Model 1914 - Base Series Designation; original production models with Picric filling.
Model 1917 - Chemical grenade.
Model 1914/30 - Model of 1930; TNT filling.
Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 11/11/2020 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site; No A.I. was used in the generation of this content.

Like other military powers of the World War 1 period (1914-1918), the Russian Army adopted a "stick grenade" design as an anti-infantry measure. In Imperial Russian Army service, this became the "Model 1914", a weapon designed by Vladimir Rdultovsky and a modification of the earlier Model 1912 model. The grenade carried either a Picric Acid or TNT filling depending on the production model and was used for decades before a successor was eventually adopted.

The basic function of the Model 1914 relied on a 4- to 5-second timed-fuse delay. The "stick" nature of the grenade, popular during the World War 1 period, allowed the base to be held as a handle in one hand and the safety catch to be operated with the other. Once the catch was released, the grenade was active and could be thrown - the safety pin releasing when the grenade went airborne. Overall length of the grenade reached 235mm with a diameter of 45mm while weight was between 500 grams and 780 grams depending on production model.

There were three primary forms of the series: the basic concussion grenade was the Model 1914 and this was followed by the dimensionally larger and slightly heavier Model 1917 which was developed as a chemical weapon (releasing Chloropicrin around the detonation area). The Model 1914/30 was an interwar development essentially taking the Model 1914 design and switching to a TNT filling. The grenade could further be converted to a fragmentation weapon by applying a thin metal sleeve - though at the expense of added weight.

The Model 1914 and its derivatives saw combat service during World War 1 (up until the Russian departure in 1917) and throughout World War 2 (1939-1945), this now under the Soviet flag due to the large stocks that remained in circulation. Captured examples (mainly Model 194/30 versions) by the Germans were redesignated to HG 336(r).

The Model 1914 was succeeded in Red Army service by the RGD-33 (fragmentation stick) and RGD-5 (fragmentation egg) types though it managed to see service into the 1980s in a reduced training role.

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Operators
Global customers who have evaluated and/or operated the Model 1914 Stick Grenade. Nations are displayed by flag, each linked to their respective national small arms listing.

Contractor(s): State Factories - Soviet Union
National flag of Russia National flag of the Soviet Union

[ Imperial Russia; Soviet Union ]
Going Further...
The Model 1914 Stick Grenade Concussion / Fragmentation Grenade appears in the following collections:
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