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Remington Model 1875 New Army

Six-Shot Single-Action Revolver

Remington Model 1875 New Army

Six-Shot Single-Action Revolver

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



Despite the strong Remington revolver pedigree, the Model 1875 New Army could not compete with the popular Colt Peacemaker line.
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ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1875
MANUFACTURER(S): Remington Arms - USA
OPERATORS: United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible. Calibers listed may be model/chambering dependent.
ACTION: Single-Action; Rotating Cylinder
CALIBER(S): .45 Colt; .44 Remington; .44-40 Winchester
LENGTH (OVERALL): 305 millimeters (12.01 inches)
LENGTH (BARREL): 305 millimeters (12.01 inches)
WEIGHT (UNLOADED): 2.69 pounds (1.22 kilograms)
SIGHTS: Front Iron
RATE-OF-FIRE: 6 rounds-per-minute
RANGE (EFFECTIVE): 300 feet (91 meters; 100 yards)
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Model 1875 New Army - Base Series Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Remington Model 1875 New Army Six-Shot Single-Action Revolver.  Entry last updated on 2/26/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Remington Model 1875 New Army followed the form and function of the successful Model 1858 which saw widespread use and acceptance during the American Civil War. These guns were also used globally in conflicts across Mexico and Europe. The Model 1875 retained the former's use of a top-strap frame which led to increased structural strength when compared to competing open-frame Colt guns of the period. Additionally, the line used the same webbed under-barrel structure which completed the recognizable Remington "look". Whereas the original Model 1858 was designed around powder-and-ball ammunition and, later, paper cartridges with percussion cap ignition, the Model 1875 was specifically developed around use of metallic cartridge ammunition. The Model 1875 was supposed to be Remington's answer the hugely popular Colt .45 single-action revolver (better known as the "Peacemaker") and represented Remington's first foray into the metallic cartridge revolver market.

The Model 1875 was chambered for the US Army's .45 Colt cartridge and other forms eventually brought about use of the .44-40 Winchester and .44 Remington cartridge lines. The weapon relied on a single-action form of operation in which the operator was required to manually cock the hammer prior to firing (the trigger pull being used to release the hammer). The weapon held a maximum engagement range out to 160 feet though accuracy was improved the closer the target was to the shooter. Iron sights provided some accuracy through a rear milled groove coupled with a front blade. The pistol was fed via a removable, six-shot rotating cylinder in the usual way.




This Remington product was eventually late to the game by some two full years as the Colt Peacemaker had already found favor with the US Government through Army-bound contracts. Thusly, the Model 1875 saw production totals reach only around 25,000 to 30,000 units from a manufacturing period stemming from 1875 into 1889. Some 10,000 guns were ordered by the Egyptian government but the order was hampered by unpaid debts and few of the committed amount were actually delivered.