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Warner Carbine

Breech-Loaded Rifled Gun

Warner Carbine

Breech-Loaded Rifled Gun

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Warner Carbine found its way onto the battlefields of the American Civil War in limited numbers - it arrived in 1864 and the war ended in 1865.
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ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1864
MANUFACTURER(S): Massachusetts Arms Company - USA
OPERATORS: United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible. Calibers listed may be model/chambering dependent.
ACTION: Breech-Loaded; Single-Shot
CALIBER(S): .50 Rimfire
LENGTH (BARREL): 508 millimeters (20.00 inches)
SIGHTS: Iron
RATE-OF-FIRE: 12 rounds-per-minute
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Warner Carbine - Base Series Name


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Warner Carbine Breech-Loaded Rifled Gun.  Entry last updated on 3/29/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
During the American Civil War in 1863, James Warner was granted a patent for a new breech-loading, cartridge-based firearm that became known as the Warner Carbine. The design took on a conventional arrangement and was chambered for the .50 rimfire cartridge. A wooden stock and forend bookended the brass receiver which enclosed the working systems of the gun. The trigger unit was underslung in the usual way. The barrel was of 20-inch length and set ahead of the action. Its length was such that only a single band joined it at the stock. This design was handed to the Massachusetts Arms Company to fulfill a production contract in 1864 - the war's final full year.

The carbine proved itself a reliable and effective man-stopping system for its short exposure in the war. A hinge allowed access to the breech for loading / reloading of cartridges and the spent cartridges themselves were extracted by way of a slide at the forend. These qualities made for a very modern weapon for its time - though the carbine was still limited to single shots which could prove a liability in combat.

Due to the end of the war, only about 1,500 of these carbines were completed.