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Ruger GP100

Double-Action (DA) Revolver

Ruger GP100

Double-Action (DA) Revolver

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Ruger GP100 was introduced in 1985 and continues production today, offering good man-stopping firepower in a compact package.
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ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1985
MANUFACTURER(S): Sturm, Ruger & Company - USA
OPERATORS: Greece; United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible. Calibers listed may be model/chambering dependent.
ACTION: Double-Action (DA); Rotating Cylinder
CALIBER(S): .357 Magnum; .44 Special; .322 LR
LENGTH (OVERALL): 220 millimeters (8.66 inches)
LENGTH (BARREL): 110 millimeters (4.33 inches)
WEIGHT (UNLOADED): 2.87 pounds (1.30 kilograms)
SIGHTS: Iron Front and Rear
RANGE (EFFECTIVE): 300 feet (91 meters; 100 yards)
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• GP100 - Base Series Name


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Ruger GP100 Double-Action (DA) Revolver.  Entry last updated on 2/17/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Ruger GP100 was a mid-1980s entry into the revolver market by the storied American company. A no-frills weapon, it offered perfected man-stopping firepower in a compact and relatively comfortable package. The firing action of the gun was designed as Double-Action (DA) and versions offered included five- and six-shot cylinder types with varying barrel lengths. Accepted chamberings, dependent on model, included .357 Magnum, .44 Special, and .22 LR.

The cylinder was given a "triple-lock' design set within a solid frame offering improved alignment of chamber-to-barrel. The grips were replaceable to suit operator taste and featured an ergonomic approach with exaggerated finger grooves (a Hogue Monogrip was standard and served as a recoil-reducing measure). Sights were set over the front and rear of the weapon in the usual way. Takedown of the revolver required no specialized tools - owing much to its general simplicity.

The GP100 is actively marketed by Ruger as of this writing (2017).




MEDIA