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Enfield Pattern 1856

Rifle-Musket Long Gun

Enfield Pattern 1856

Rifle-Musket Long Gun

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
VARIANTS
HISTORY
IMAGES
OVERVIEW



The Enfield Pattern 1856 was nothing more than a shorter, two-banded form of the original, full-length Pattern of 1853.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United Kingdom
YEAR: 1856
MANUFACTURER(S): Royal Small Arms Factory / Enfield Lock - UK
OPERATORS: Brazil; Confederate States; Japan; United Kingdom; United States
National flag of Brazil
BRA
National flag of Confederate States
CSA
National flag of Japan
JPN
National flag of United Kingdom
UK
National flag of United States
USA
SPECIFICATIONS



Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible. * Calibers listed may be model/chambering dependent.
ACTION: Percussion Lock; Single-Shot
CALIBER(S)*: .577 Minie ball paper cartidge
SIGHTS: Adjustable Rear; Fixed Front
ADVERTISEMENTS
LENGTH (O/A)

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mm
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inches
BARREL LGTH

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mm
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inches
WEIGHT

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pounds
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kilograms
MUZZLE VEL.

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fps
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meters-per-second
RATE-OF-FIRE

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rpm
RANGE (EFF)

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feet
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Meters
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Yards
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Pattern 1856 - Base Series Designation; based on the model of 1853.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Enfield Pattern 1856 Rifle-Musket Long Gun.  Entry last updated on 9/12/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The British Enfield Pattern 1856 followed the original Pattern 1853 into service in an effort to produce a more "infantry-friendly" long gun. The original forms were effective man-killers to be sure however their primary physical restriction lay in their length which made them unwieldy for late-19 Century warfare. Now that barrel rifling was permeating long guns and infantry warfare was done at closer ranges than before, the length of barrels could be reduced to an extent (at the cost of range). This led to many full-length guns being cut down to more manageable sizes - particularly valued by forward-operating scouts and mounted infantry.

The Pattern 1856 was reduced by some six inches when compared to the earlier Pattern 1853. The barrel now measured 33 inches long. It continued use of the .577 ball as its ammunition and operated from a percussion cap action. The primary distinguishing mark of the line (beyond its obvious reduced length) was its two-banded design, these metal bands used to clasp the wooden stock to the barrel assembly and form a rigid, robust framework. A ram rod was contained under the barrel in the usual way and the action took place near the rear of the gun. The shoulder stock was integrated to the gun in traditional fashion with the grip area formed between it and the forend. Underslung slings allowed for a strap to be affixed and eased transporting of the rifle when on-the-march.

Both sides of the American Civil War (1861-1865) procured the Pattern 1856 and, of course, the British Empire fielded it in number - typically issued to its rank of sergeants and skirmish troops. Manufacture was by way of Enfield of England and Tower Armories.








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