Military Factory logo
Icon of a dollar sign
Icon of military officer saluting
Icon of F-15 Eagle military combat fighter aircraft
Icon of Abrams Main Battle Tank
Icon of AK-47 assault rifle
Icon of navy warships

Vickers K (VGO)

Medium Machine Gun / Aircraft-Vehicle Machine Gun

Vickers K (VGO)

Medium Machine Gun / Aircraft-Vehicle Machine Gun

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Vickers K was an aircraft gun developed from the earlier Vickers-Berthier Light Machine Gun series.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United Kingdom
YEAR: 1935
MANUFACTURER(S): Vickers-Armstrong - UK
OPERATORS: India; United Kingdom
SPECIFICATIONS



Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible. Calibers listed may be model/chambering dependent.
ACTION: Gas-Operated; Tilting Locking Breechblock
CALIBER(S): .303 British
LENGTH (OVERALL): 940 millimeters (37.01 inches)
LENGTH (BARREL): 529 millimeters (20.83 inches)
WEIGHT (UNLOADED): 29.76 pounds (13.50 kilograms)
SIGHTS: Iron
MUZZLE VELOCITY: 2,500 feet-per-second (762 meters-per-second)
RATE-OF-FIRE: 1,000 rounds-per-minute
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Vickers K - Commercial Designation
• Vickers Gas-Operated (VGO) - Alternative Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Vickers K (VGO) Medium Machine Gun / Aircraft-Vehicle Machine Gun.  Entry last updated on 7/27/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Vickers K - or Vickers Gas Operated (VGO) and also officially as "Gun, machine, Vickers-Berthier, 0.303-inch, India Service Mark III" - was an aerial gun developed from the original Vickers-Berthier Light Machine Gun (LMG) for use in trainable/flexible aircraft positions. A pan magazine (60- or 100-round counts used) replaced the original's box magazine feed and it fired the standard .303 British cartridge through a gas-operated, air-cooled action. The firing rate was 900 rounds-per-minute. The operator managed the weapon through a spade grip arrangement at the rear of the receiver with iron sights set over the weapon for basic accuracy assistance. Installation on aircraft was by way of ring mounts.

As the British Royal Air Force (RAF) ultimately moved away from open-air gun positions on its aircraft, the .303 Colt-Browning became the preferred in-wing and turreted aircraft armament arrangement. After their time with the RAF had ended, the guns found renewed service lives with the British Army and made good as vehicle-mounted weapons. Special forces elements operating in North Africa found them to be exceptionally reliable and effective weapons in desert conditions when mounted on fast-moving JEEP-type platforms.

The Vickers K saw wartime service until the end in 1945 and was progressively evolved throughout the conflict.




MEDIA