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Fateh (class)

Diesel-Electric Coastal Submarine

Fateh (class)

Diesel-Electric Coastal Submarine

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
SHIPS-IN-CLASS
ARMAMENT
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Islamic Republic of Iran Navy is believed to be operating two of the compact Fateh-class boats to date.
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ORIGIN: Iran
YEAR: 2014
STATUS: Commissioned, in Active Service
SHIP CLASS: Fateh-class
SHIPS-IN-CLASS (2): Fateh (2011); Fateh (2015)
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OPERATORS: Iran
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the base Fateh (class) design. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW / COMPLEMENT: 22
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LENGTH: 157 feet (47.85 meters)
BEAM: 15 feet (4.57 meters)
DRAUGHT: 14 feet (4.27 meters)
DISPLACEMENT (SURFACE): 530 tons
DISPLACEMENT (SUBMERGED): 600 tons
PROPULSION: Diesel-electric powerplant driving a single shaft astern.
SPEED (SURFACE): 11 knots (13 miles-per-hour)
SPEED (SUBMERGED): 14 miles-per-hour (16 miles-per-hour)
RANGE: 3,650 nautical miles (4,200 miles; 6,759 kilometers)
ARMAMENT



4 x 533mm (21") torpedo tubes (4 total reloads estimated).
AIR WING



None.
HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Fateh (class) Diesel-Electric Coastal Submarine.  Entry last updated on 1/4/2019. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ¬©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
For the modern Islamic Republic of Iran Navy (IRAN), the Fateh-class group of submarines may number just two boats. Lead-ship Fateh was constructed at the Marine Industries Organization and represents a step towards local submarine production and military weapons independence for the sanctions-stricken, oil-rich Gulf nation. The Fateh-class marks the first indigenous attack-minded submarine for Iran. Its design is believed to have been heavily influenced by both Chinese and North Korean submarine types operated by the Gulf state and is specifically developed for shallow water / coastal operations.

The "Fateh" name translates to "Conqueror" in Persian.

The arrangement of the boat is largely conventional as well as traditional: the sail (or "fin") is set near midships and the bow is blunt, housing a sonar fit. The sail is said to contain a "lock-out" chamber for use by special forces operatives ("frogmen") undertaking clandestine / sabotage missions. The tail section relies on a cruciform plane pattern with the single shaft extended aft. Dive planes are positioned along the upper reaches of the hull (as opposed to on the sail). Displacement reaches 530 tons surfaced and 600 tons submerged while dimensions include a running length of 157 feet and the compact size of the submarine allows for efficient operation close-to-shore. The hull has been tested to depths of 655 feet (200 meters).

Internally, there is a conventional diesel-electric powerplant in play providing the vessel with a surfaced speed of 11 knots and a submerged speed reaching 14 knots. The boat can reach out to 3,600 nautical miles, making it useful in coastal patrol and deterrence sorties, and can remain submerged for you to 35 days according to local media reports. Armament is 4 x 533,, (21") torpedo tubes, all in the bow, while there might also be support for firing missiles and laying naval mines. The complement of the submarine is unknown - though perhaps at least twenty make up her crew based on comparable, contemporary designs.

Announced in October of 2011, the first boat of the class was reportedly received by the Navy sometime in 2013 and immediately entered trials thereafter. It was first observed and officially launched around or during November of 2014. The status of the second boat is not known - it was photographed while under construction at Bandar Anzali Naval Base (Caspian Sea) at some point and thought to be in active service with the IRIN since 2015.






MEDIA