Military Factory logo
Icon of a dollar sign
Icon of military officer saluting
Icon of F-15 Eagle military combat fighter aircraft
Icon of Abrams Main Battle Tank
Icon of AK-47 assault rifle
Icon of navy warships

ARM Revolucion (P-164)

Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV)

ARM Revolucion (P-164)

Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV)

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
SHIPS-IN-CLASS
ARMAMENT
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



ARM Revolucion P-164, an offshore patrol vessel of the Mexican Navy, was commissioned in 2010 as the fourth ship of the class.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Mexico
YEAR: 2010
SHIP CLASS: Oaxaca-class
SHIPS-IN-CLASS (8): ARM Oaxaca (P-161); ARM Baja California (P-162); ARM Independencia (P-163); ARM Revolucion (P-164); ARM Chiapas (P-165); ARM Zacatecas (P-166); Unnamed (P-167); Unnamed (P-168)
OPERATORS: Mexico
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the base ARM Revolucion (P-164) design. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 116
LENGTH: 282.1 feet (85.98 meters)
BEAM: 34.3 feet (10.45 meters)
DRAUGHT: 11.7 feet (3.57 meters)
DISPLACEMENT (SURFACE): 1,680 tons
PROPULSION: 2 x Caterpillar 3616 V16 diesel engines driving 2 x Shafts.
SPEED (SURFACE): 20 knots (23 miles-per-hour)
ARMAMENT



1 x Otobreda 76mm turreted deck gun
1 x OTO Melara 30mm autocannon
2 x OTO Melara Mod 517 Close-In Weapon Systems (CIWSs)
AIR WING



1 x Medium-lift navy helicopter, typically Eurocopter Panther.
HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the ARM Revolucion (P-164) Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV).  Entry last updated on 4/17/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ¬©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Mexican Navy has contracted for eight of the Oaxaca-class offshore patrol vessels to be built. These craft are modestly armed for patrol duty in and around Mexican waters, both in the Gulf of Mexico and along the Pacific Coast, and are appropriately armed with a conventional array of projectile-firing systems. Of the eight planned, four have since been delivered as of August 2015. The Oaxaca name comes from the state of Oaxaca.

Mexico holds a coastline that covers some 9,330 kilometers and has had many decades of internal issues regarding illegal immigration into the United States and the drug trade involving many of its neighbor nations. As such, its naval assets are in play as much as its ground forces are when weeding out those elements seeking to break national and international laws. Offshore patrol vessels provide the speed and firepower necessary for intercepting illegal shipments to and from Mexico.

The ARM Revolucion (P-164) became the forth ship of the Oaxaca-class when she was commissioned for service in the Mexican Navy during 2010. She followed her sisters ARM Oaxaca (P-161), ARM Baja California (P-162) and ARM Independencia (P-163) as they came online in May 2003, April 2003 and 2010 respectively. The vessels provide more than a show of muscle for their hulls are capable of tackling the shallows when operating offshore and can conduct deep water operations when called upon - thus these warships are employed in roles that include surveillance, humanitarian service and general maritime duties.

Revolucion displaces 1,680 tons (short) and features an overall length of 282 feet, a beam of 34.3 feet and a draught of 11.7 feet. Her machinery consists of 2 x Caterpillar 3616 series V16 diesel engines driving 2 x shafts at speeds of 20 knots. She carries a Terma Scanter 2001 series sensor as well as a Selex NA-25 series radar fit and an optronic Fire Control System (FCS). A complete navigation / surface search suite also makes up part of her modern internal arrangement. A typical crew numbers 77 personnel and she can also house up to forty marines for amphibious assault work or special forces units for clandestine operations. Her flight deck found along the stern can support up to 1 x medium-lift helicopter, typically a Eurocopter (now Airbus Helicopters) AS565 "Panther" being identified. A full-service hangar is part of her hull design.

In terms of armament, Revolucion lacks much of the advanced missile-minded hardware seen in American, Russian and European warships as her given role calls for a more modest fit of autocannons and medium-to-heavy machine guns. Her primary weapon is a deck-mounted Italian-originated 76mm Otobreda turreted gun backed by 2 x Italian OTO Melara Mod 517 systems operated through remote-control. Her armament package is rounded out by an Italian 30mm OTO Melara autocannon.

Her profile silhouette showcases a noticeably short forecastle with elevated bow sides. The turreted deck gun is fitted immediately forward with the bridge and its corresponding superstructure just aft. The superstructure is continuous along the length of the ship before the flight deck with a single primary mast being fitted seating the major sensors and processing components of the vessel. The smoke funnel is integrated well into the ship's superstructure near midships and is of a modern low profile design. The hangar makes up the last section of the superstructure with the remaining deck space reserved for the helipad.




MEDIA