×
Aircraft / Aviation Vehicles & Artillery Infantry Arms Warships & Submarines Military Pay Scale Military Ranks
HOME
ARMOR
MODERN ARMIES
COUNTRIES
MANUFACTURERS
COMPARE
BY CONFLICT
BY TYPE
BY DECADE
COLD WAR
MODERN

Type 75 SPG


Self-Propelled Howitzer (1975)


Land Systems / Battlefield

1 / 1
Image from the United States Department of Defense imagery database; No endorsement implied.

Jump-to: Specifications

The Type 75 155mm Self-Propelled Howitzer has been in service with the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force since 1975.



Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 05/26/2017 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.
Like other world militaries, the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force (JGSDF) went ahead with its adoption of a self-propelled 155mm-armed track howitzer vehicle to serve as a support weapon for its ground actions. The vehicle became the Type 75 and was adopted in 1975, joining the limited-run Type 74 model which featured a 105mm howitzer weapon and production totaling just 20 units. The Type 75 managed a more healthy production run of 201 vehicles and has remained in service since its adoption. It fills a clear role in its service to the JGSDF. The Type 99 of 1985 has since been developed as its modern successor and 99 of the new breed have been completed to date.

The Type 75 saw design and development work begin in 1969 and run through 1975 before formal adoption and serial production. Pilot vehicles emerged during 1971-1972 for testing and evaluations. The vehicle weighed 28 tons (short) and featured a configuration not unlike the classic American M109 series. The driver was seated at front-right with the powerpack to his left. The turret was sat upon the rear section of the hull. The chassis was taken from the Type 74 Main Battle Tank and included six double-tired road wheels to a hull side with the drive sprocket at front. No rear track idler was used as were no track return rollers featured. The Type 74 MBT held a rear-mounted sprocket with front-mounted idler and the driver seated at front-left with the engine in the rear of the hull. So obvious changes were made to the Type 74 MBT's design to begat the Type75 SPH. Development of the chassis fell to Mitsubishi Heavy Industries which also supplied the engine - a 6ZF 6-cylinder diesel engine of 450 horsepower. Maximum speed reached 29 miles per hour with a road range of out to 190 miles. Suspension was through a proven torsion bar arrangement. Armor protection was of aluminum.
Japan Steel Works was charged with development of the turret and gun system. The latter became a 155mm L30 howitzer weapon whose mounting allowed for inherent elevation for indirect fire. The turret provided a full 360-degree traversal allowing the vehicle to engage at all angled without having to turn itself in the direction of the target area. The main gun was fitted with the requisite fume extractor at its midway point and a double-baffled muzzle brake. 28 x 155mm projectiles were carried aboard and the projectiles are loaded separately from the required bag charge. Local defense was through a single 0.50 caliber heavy machine gun at the right side turret hatch with 1,000 x 0.50 caliber rounds carried. The driver, loader and commander all operated under armored hatches while a full crew of six was featured (two gunners, a layer and radioman were also part of the crew).

The Type 75 featured a effective firing range of 21,000 yards utilizing its basic High-Explosive (HE) munitions. Rocket-Assisted Projectiles (RAPs) went as far as 26,000 yards providing the Type 75 with a fairly good reach on the modern battlefield. The gun system, coupled with a well-trained crew, could reach a rate-of-fire of six rounds per minute. Several vehicles firing in concert could therefore supply a lethal barrage at range, ahead of the main fighting force and useful in destroying enemy fornications or dislodging concentrations of enemy troops.

Despite its successor having already been named and appearing in growing numbers, the Type 75 maintains an active presence in the inventory of the JGSDF.

Specifications



Service Year
1975

Origin
Japan national flag graphic
Japan

Crew
6
CREWMEN
Production
201
UNITS


Mitsubishi Heavy Industries / Japan Iron Works - Japan
National flag of modern Japan Japan
(OPERATORS list includes past, present, and future operators when applicable)
Fire Support / Assault / Breaching
Support allied forces through direct / in-direct fire, assault forward positions, and / or breach fortified areas of the battlefield.


Length
25.6 ft
7.79 m
Width
9.8 ft
3 m
Height
8.2 ft
2.5 m
Weight
55,777 lb
25,300 kg
Tonnage
27.9 tons
MEDIUM
(Showcased structural values pertain to the base Type 75 SPG production variant. Length typically includes main gun in forward position if applicable to the design)
Powerplant: 1 x Mitsubishi 6ZF 6-cylinder diesel engine developing 450 horsepower.
Speed
29.2 mph
(47.0 kph)
Range
186.4 mi
(300.0 km)
(Showcased performance specifications pertain to the base Type 75 SPG production variant. Compare this entry against any other in our database)
1 x 155mm L30 howitzer
1 x 12.7mm M2HB Browning heavy machine gun


Supported Types


Graphical image of a tank medium machine gun
Graphical image of a tank heavy machine gun


(Not all weapon types may be represented in the showcase above)
28 x 155mm projectiles
1,000 x 12.7mm ammunition


Type 75 - Base Series Deisgnation


Military lapel ribbon for the American Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of the Bulge
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Kursk
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental military vehicles


Ribbon graphics not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns / operations.

Advertisements





Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Cookies


2022 Military Pay Scale Army Ranks Navy Ranks Air Force Ranks Alphabet Code DoD Dictionary American War Deaths French Military Victories Vietnam War Casualties

The "Military Factory" name and MilitaryFactory.com logo are registered ® U.S. trademarks protected by all applicable domestic and international intellectual property laws. All written content, illustrations, and photography are unique to this website (unless where indicated) and not for reuse/reproduction in any form. Material presented throughout this website is for historical and entertainment value only and should not to be construed as usable for hardware restoration, maintenance, or general operation. We do not sell any of the items showcased on this site. Please direct all other inquiries to militaryfactory AT gmail.com.

Part of a network of sites that includes GlobalFirepower, a data-driven property used in ranking the top military powers of the world, WDMMA.org, the World Directory of Modern Military Aircraft, and SR71blackbird.org, detailing the history of the world's most iconic spyplane.


Facebook Logo YouTube Logo

www.MilitaryFactory.com • All Rights Reserved • Content ©2003-