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WORLD WAR 2

SdKfz 164 Hornisse / Nashorn


Tank Destroyer (TD) (1943)


Land Systems / Battlefield

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Jump-to: Specifications

Though mobility was a constant issue for the powerful Nashorn design, her crews experienced a great level of success in taking on enemy tanks from long range.



Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 10/20/2018 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.
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The SdKfz 164 came about from the existing weapon carrier vehicle designed to lug the sFH 18 artillery gun. This vehicle was itself a combination of Panzer III tank parts and the chassis of the Panzer IV tank, making it an efficient vehicle to produce from available stores. This system was designated as the Geschutzwagen III/IV and was selected as the chassis to field the powerful PaK 43 anti-tank gun in a new SdKfz 164 Panzerjager design - in essence an improvised design to fulfill a growing battlefield requirement.

The mammoth SdKfz 164 was an imposing tank destroying platform for Germany in the Second World War. With the obsolete Panzer III and Panzer IV chassis still in inventory or on production lines, it was decided to put them to better use by modifying them to become self-propelled guns mounting the powerful 88mm PaK 43 series. To accomplish this, the hull was lengthened to accommodate the new gun and the engine relocated while armor was removed in an effort to keep the vehicles weight at a respectable level.

The main gun was fitted into a high superstructure which provided the vehicle with a tall profile and its turretless design meant that the entire vehicle would have to be turned in order to engage the enemy. The turret also offered no protection to the firing crew and commander from above or to the rear as it was an open-top design. As such, crews had to resort to battlefield modifications to keep the elements or shrapnel out and were issued small arms and a machine gun for self-defense work. Power was derived from a Maybach HL 12-cylinder engine producing some 300 horsepower and a crew of five personnel could man the system with the driver being the only one to benefit from any type of armor protection.

In its initial form, the SdKfz 164 appeared with the designation of "Hornisse" (meaning "Hornet") though this was later changed at Hitler's request with the name of "Nashorn" (meaning "Rhinoceros") as he required a more imposing name attached to the vehicle. Early Hornisse models were fitted with the standard PaK 43 L/71 main gun while later Nashorn models sported the new and improved PaK 43/1 L/71 occurring from 1944 onward. Both vehicles were similarly designed and constructed apart from their main armament.

Once in combat, the SdKfz 164 proved its worth against Soviet armor of all classifications, engaging and defeating them some 2,000 to 4,000 meters away. After action reports dictated how the sheer velocity of the 88mm round could simply tear apart the Soviet T-34s like paper with a single direct hit. Mobility of the system did play a part in its usefulness however and the tank destroyer most always performed better when dug into a prepared position. The Hornisse/Nashorn series would later be superseded by the purpose-built Jagdpanther and Jagdpanzer tank-killing designs.

Specifications



Service Year
1943

Origin
Nazi Germany national flag graphic
Nazi Germany

Crew
4 or 5
CREWMEN
Production
473
UNITS


Alkett / Deutsche Eisenwerke - Nazi Germany
National flag of modern Germany National flag of Nazi Germany Nazi Germany
(OPERATORS list includes past, present, and future operators when applicable)
Tank-vs-Tank
Engage armored vehicles of similar form and function.


Length
27.7 ft
8.44 m
Width
9.4 ft
2.86 m
Height
8.7 ft
2.65 m
Weight
53,793 lb
24,400 kg
Tonnage
26.9 tons
MEDIUM
(Showcased structural values pertain to the 8.8-cm PaK 43/1 (L/71) auf Geschutzwagen III und IV (Sf) production variant. Length typically includes main gun in forward position if applicable to the design)
Powerplant: 1 x Maybach HL 120 TRM V-12 water-cooled gasoline-fueled engine developing 300 horsepower to track-and-wheel arrangement.
Speed
26.1 mph
(42.0 kph)
Range
161.6 mi
(260.0 km)
(Showcased performance specifications pertain to the 8.8-cm PaK 43/1 (L/71) auf Geschutzwagen III und IV (Sf) production variant. Compare this entry against any other in our database)
Hornisse:
1 x 88mm PaK 43 L/71 main gun
1 x 7.92mm MG34 or MG42 machine gun

Nashorn:
1 x 88mm PaK43/1 L/71 main gun
1 x 7.92mm MG34 or MG42 machine gun


Supported Types


Graphical image of a tank cannon armament
Graphical image of a tank medium machine gun


(Not all weapon types may be represented in the showcase above)
24 x 88mm projectiles (Hornisse)
40 x 88mm projectiles (Nashorn)
600 x 7.92mm ammunition


Panzerjager Hornisse (Hornet) - Fitted with 88mm PaK 43 L/71 main gun; based on the Geschutzwagen III/IV system.
Panzerjager Nashorn (Rhinoceros) - Fitted with newer 88mm PaK 43/1 L/71 main gun; overall model design very similar in many respects to the original Hornisse model.


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