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Steyr ADGZ (M35 Mittlere Panzerwagen)

8x8 Wheeled Armored Car

Steyr ADGZ (M35 Mittlere Panzerwagen)

8x8 Wheeled Armored Car

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



Fewer than 60 of the Austria-originated ADGZ eight-wheeled armored cars were produced prior to World War 2 - these used by Austrian and German forces in the ensuing battles.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Austria
YEAR: 1935
MANUFACTURER(S): Steyr / Daimler - Austria
PRODUCTION: 52
OPERATORS: Austria; Nazi Germany
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Steyr ADGZ (M35 Mittlere Panzerwagen) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 6
LENGTH: 20.51 feet (6.25 meters)
WIDTH: 7.05 feet (2.15 meters)
HEIGHT: 8.37 feet (2.55 meters)
WEIGHT: 13 Tons (12,000 kilograms; 26,455 pounds)
ENGINE: 1 x Austro-Daimler M612 6-cylinder gasoline-fueled engine developing 150 horsepower.
SPEED: 43 miles-per-hour (70 kilometers-per-hour)
RANGE: 280 miles (450 kilometers)




ARMAMENT



1 x 20mm KwK 35 L/45 OR 45mm 19-K cannon in turret.
3 x 7.92mm MG34 machine guns OR 2 x 7.92mm machine guns with 1 x 7.62mm DT machine gun.

Ammunition:
100 x 20mm projectiles
NBC PROTECTION: None.
NIGHTVISION: None.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• ADGZ - Base Series Designation
• M35 Mittlere Panzerwagen - Austrian Army Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Steyr ADGZ (M35 Mittlere Panzerwagen) 8x8 Wheeled Armored Car.  Entry last updated on 6/1/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
Design work on a new local armored car for the Austrian Army began in 1934 and resulted in the "M35 Mittlere Panzerwagen" - also known as the "ADGZ". The vehicle was produced by Steyr from 1935 until the end of 1941 and yielded a total of 52 units. These were used both locally by the Austrian police and Army forces and, later, by the Germans who pressed them into combat during the Invasion of Poland in September of 1939.

The design incorporated an effective 8x8 suspended wheel arrangement which offered excellent on-road and off-road capabilities. Four axles were in play with the two center pair held close to one another. The front and rear sets were fitted at the extreme respective ends of the vehicle. The armored superstructure featured angled faces for basic ballistics protection and armor reached 11mm in thickness at critical facings. Dimensions of the vehicle included an overall length of 6.25 meters, a width of 2.15 meters, and a height of 2.55 meters. Internally there was a crew of six and drive power came from an Austro-Daimler M612 series 6-cylinder 12-liter gasoline-fueled engine developing 150 horsepower. Operational range reached 280 miles with road speeds nearing 45 miles per hour.

Primary armament was a 20mm KwK 35 L/45 cannon held in a roof-mounted turret. Secondary armament was through 3 x 7.92mm MG34 machine guns.

The Austrian Army took on a stock of twelve ADGZ vehicles and a further fifteen were purchased by Austrian police units. The German SS was keen on the design and procured at least twenty-five examples of their own - using them in policing duties, reconnaissance roles, and hit-and-run guerilla-style tactics when the need arose. The type saw service from the Polish Invasion campaign of 1939 to the German invasion of the Soviet Union of 1941 ("Operation Barbarossa"). After a healthy stock of T-26 Light Tanks were captured by the Germans from the retreating Soviets, surviving turrets were installed on ADGZ vehicles to create a semi-new, cost-effective mobile weapons platform - now fitting the more-capable Soviet 45mm anti-tank gun.




MEDIA