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T-34/122 (T-122)

Self-Propelled Gun (SPG) Tracked Combat Vehicle

T-34/122 (T-122)

Self-Propelled Gun (SPG) Tracked Combat Vehicle

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Syrian Army modified some World War 2-era T-34 Medium Tanks to take on the 122mm D-30 howitzer as a tracked Self-Propelled Gun platform.
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ORIGIN: Syria
YEAR: 1973
MANUFACTURER(S): State Factories - Syria
PRODUCTION: 30
OPERATORS: Syria
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the T-34/122 (T-122) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 7
LENGTH: 20.67 feet (6.3 meters)
WIDTH: 9.84 feet (3 meters)
ENGINE: 1 x V-2 12-cylinder diesel-fueled engine developing 493 horsepower.
SPEED: 34 miles-per-hour (55 kilometers-per-hour)
RANGE: 224 miles (360 kilometers)




ARMAMENT



1 x 122mm D-30 howitzer.

Ammunition:
Dependent upon ammunition carrier.
NBC PROTECTION: None.
NIGHTVISION: None.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• T-34/122 - Base Series Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the T-34/122 (T-122) Self-Propelled Gun (SPG) Tracked Combat Vehicle.  Entry last updated on 5/21/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
With an expiring stock of Soviet-made, World War 2-era T-34 Medium Tanks on hand as well as a healthy supply of Soviet 122mm D-30 howitzers, the Syrian Army adopted the "T-34/122" as a Self-Propelled Howitzer (SPH) vehicle. The chassis, hull, and running gear of the T-34 remained largely unchanged which preserved much of the vehicle's mobility and performance while the D-30 and its mounting / recoil hardware was installed along the frontal section of the tank. In this way, the weapon faced the rear of the vehicle but maintained a proper center of gravity which made the T-34/122 system a sound gunnery platform conversion. To keep the conversion process simple, the gun station used an open-air design with rear-mounted folding platform. First use of the T-34/122 came in the 1973 Yom Kippur War against Israel.

Drive power for the new vehicle came from a V-2 series 12-cylinder diesel-fueled engine of 493 horsepower. The running gear included five road wheels to a hull side. A typical crew complement numbered seven with the driver protected from the elements due to his position within the forward hull. The howitzer's mounting hardware included the needed elevation and traverse controls for the gunnery crew. The main gun barrel was capped by a multi-slotted muzzle brake to contend with the inherently powerful recoil effects of the 122mm weapon. Resupply of 122mm projectiles came from accompanying ammunition carriers.