Military Factory logo
Icon of a dollar sign
Icon of military officer saluting
Icon of F-15 Eagle military combat fighter aircraft
Icon of Abrams Main Battle Tank
Icon of AK-47 assault rifle
Icon of navy warships

Kaiser-Jeep M530

6x6 Firetruck

Kaiser-Jeep M530

6x6 Firetruck

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



Vehicles such as the M530 usually do not receive the recognition they deserve for the seemingly menial roles they play in the modern army.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1966
MANUFACTURER(S): Kaiser-Jeep Corporation - USA
PRODUCTION: 150,000
OPERATORS: United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Kaiser-Jeep M530 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 5
LENGTH: 22.97 feet (7 meters)
WIDTH: 9.84 feet (3 meters)
HEIGHT: 8.50 feet (2.59 meters)
WEIGHT: 7 Tons (6,140 kilograms; 13,536 pounds)
ENGINE: 1 x OA-331 Continental gasoline I-6 engine OR LDS-427 Turbo multi-fuel I-6 engine OR LDS-465 multi-fuel I-6 engine OR Caterpillar 3116 diesel I-6 engine devliering 127 to 170 horsepower.
SPEED: 56 miles-per-hour (90.1 kilometers-per-hour)
RANGE: 400 miles (644 kilometers)




ARMAMENT



1 x Water Cannon

Ammunition:
1 x 600 gallon water tank
NBC PROTECTION: None
NIGHTVISION: None
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• M530 - Base Production Model Series Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Kaiser-Jeep M530 6x6 Firetruck.  Entry last updated on 5/16/2016. Authored by JR Potts, AUS 173d AB. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Kaiser Jeep Model 530 6X6 was a firefighting truck that first saw production 1966. She was an important vehicle, oft-overlooked, but earned her keep by way of responding to the most dangerous and sometimes deadly missions - fire control. Her 6x6 traction and gear ratio, 5,000lb maximum payload and her 56 mile per hour top speed allowed her to get to where she was needed at a moment's notice. Production of the Model 530 began in 1964 under the Kaiser brand, to which some 150,000 examples were produced. Production was undertaken out of a former Studebaker truck plant in South Bend, Indiana.

The 530 model utility series was purchased by the United States military for all its branches of service but found most of its users in the United States Air Force. These systems were utilized to supplement the fire fighting teams stationed along the flight lines all over the world on American bases. The Model 530 had a dual fire fighting capability: able to fight electrically-based fires with foam or fuel-based fires with water. She was fitted with a 50-gallon fuel tank and prospered out to a range of 400 miles. She has the capacity to hold 600-gallons of water in an internal water tank. Water pressure at full blast was a reported 250lbs of pressure.

The design of the Kaiser Jeep Model 530 6X6 firefighting truck was such that every square inch of her was utilized for the carrying of the many required tools and devices needed in fighting fires. The cabin was a typical flat-faced rectangular design, featuring the driver on the left side and a passenger on the right. Along the driver's side of the truck were another four large storage compartments plus an open storage area for a fire extinguisher, this mounted close to the standing platform for easy access. On the passenger side there were three large storage compartments suitable for the storing of helmets and the all-important fire suits as well as hose nozzles or additional foam and water. Crowbars and other small hand-held tools (such as wrenches for activating hydrants) were also carried.

The rear of the 530 featured a standing platform that could carry three firefighters at the ready. Readily available to these individuals was the primary hose storage. Above their heads were two overhead crossbars holding a 24-foot (7m) extension ladder. Levers and controls for water flow values and additional storage for two 12-foot hard hoses were also present. The front of the vehicle had a heavy duty bumper fitted and the traditional red light blister was found on the top of the crew cab. Two flood lights were positioned externally along the sides of the forward cabin frame and integrated so the driver and passenger maintained full control in directing the light beams wherever they might be needed. Two different sound sirens were set along the front fender sides and the entire vehicle was appropriately painted over in the traditional fire engine red.




MEDIA