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Flugabwehrkanonenpanzer Gepard (Flakpanzer)

Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Artillery (SPAAA)

Flugabwehrkanonenpanzer Gepard (Flakpanzer)

Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Artillery (SPAAA)

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The West German Gepard Flakpanzer Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun was based on the chassis of the Leopard 1 Main Battle Tank.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Germany
YEAR: 1974
MANUFACTURER(S): Krauss-Maffei Wegmann, Munich, Germany
PRODUCTION: 527
OPERATORS: Brazil; Belgium (retired); Chile (retired); Germany (retired) / West Germany; Jordan; Netherlands; Romania
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Flugabwehrkanonenpanzer Gepard (Flakpanzer) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 3
LENGTH: 23.26 feet (7.09 meters)
WIDTH: 10.66 feet (3.25 meters)
HEIGHT: 9.88 feet (3.01 meters)
WEIGHT: 50 Tons (45,500 kilograms; 100,310 pounds)
ENGINE: 1 x MTU MB838 Ca M500, 10-cylinder, water-cooled diesel engine developing 830 horsepower at 2,200rpm.
SPEED: 40 miles-per-hour (65 kilometers-per-hour)
RANGE: 342 miles (550 kilometers)




ARMAMENT



2 x 35mm Oerlikon autocannons
8 x 76mm Smoke Grenade Dischargers

Ammunition:
640 x 35mm anti-aircraft ammunition (320 to a gun).
40 x 35mm anti-tank ammunition (20 to a gun)
8 x 76mm Smoke Grenades
NBC PROTECTION: Yes.
NIGHTVISION: Yes - Passive.
SMOKE GENERATION: Yes.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Gepard - Variant of the Leopard 1 Main Battle Tank, utilizing the Leopard 1 chassis; fitted with 2 x 35mm Oerlikon autocannons; 10-cylinder MTU multi-fuel diesel engine.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Flugabwehrkanonenpanzer Gepard (Flakpanzer) Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Artillery (SPAAA).  Entry last updated on 3/3/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Gepard Flakpanzer, a tracked, Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun (SPAAG) platform arriving from West Germany during the Cold War, was built atop the existing - and proven - chassis of the Leopard 1 Main Battle Tank (MBT) and served mobile anti-aircraft artillery battalions of the West. It featured twin-35mm autocannons in a traversing turret and could fire a variety of air-exploding ammunition including APHE (Armor-Piercing High Explosive) and HEI (High Explosive Incendiary) rounds. The primary purpose of the system was in combating low-flying ground attack craft and helicopters featured by the Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc nations.

The automotive components of the Gepard retained the same powerpack of the Leopard 1 and was operated by a crew of three comprising of a driver, commander, and gunner. A separate powerpack was also included to drive the onboard tracking system. The turret fitted a complete Fire Control System (FCS), full tracking and search radar functionality and its guns were capable of 550 rounds-per-minute fire with a maximum effective range of about 3,500 meters (nearly 2.2 miles).




Flugabwehrkanonenpanzer Gepard (Flakpanzer) (Cont'd)

Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Artillery (SPAAA)

Flugabwehrkanonenpanzer Gepard (Flakpanzer) (Cont'd)

Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Artillery (SPAAA)



The German Army retired its last Gepard systems in 2010 - making room for a new, more modern solution based on the GTK Boxer multi-role wheeled vehicle. The Dutch version fitted a different radar system than the German offering.

The armies of Brazil (ex-German), Jordan (ex-Dutch) and Romania (ex-German) still utilize the Gepard system. Belgium and Chile have joined Germany and the Netherlands in retiring the platform.

Over 500 examples were produced.




MEDIA