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STC Orlan-10


Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)


Russia | 2014



"The STC Orlan-10 is a known participant of the fighting in Ukraine - as at least one example was downed by Ukrainian forces in May of 2014."



Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 07/13/2022 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site; No A.I. was used in the generation of this content.
Flag of Image from the Russian Ministry of Defense.
Firepower
Performance
Survivability
Versatility
Impact
The Russian defense industry has recovered nicely from its dark ages following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The country has made considerable headway in the field of 5th Generation Fighters, advanced bomber concepts, infantry small arms, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Its ongoing war with neighboring Ukraine has given Russia an active battlefield for which to test its various new developments - case-in-point being the STC Orlan-10, an Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance-minded (ISR) UAV which is known to have been used in the War in Donbass.

The Orland-10 operates through the A-95 series gasoline-fueled engine. it is launched by way of catapult (rail) and retrieved through a simply parachute delivery operation. The aircraft can reach speeds nearing 150 kph and can remain airborne for up to 16 hours, delivering data in real-time to operators on the ground out to ranges of 600 kilometers. The system operates at an altitude of about 5,000 meters. Its take-off weight is 15 kilograms and the aircraft can carry a payload of sensors and optics weighing 6 kilograms.

Its outward design is conventional as fixed-wing UAVs go. The fuselage makes up its length with the motor fitted to the nose section driving a two-bladed propeller unit. The wing mainplanes are shoulder-mounted over the fuselage ahead of midships. The tail unit incorporates a simple single-finned arrangement with two low-mounted horizontal planes. Since the drone is rail-launched and parachute-recovered, no complex undercarriage is needed in its operation. The aircraft is transported in a hard case and assembled prior to launching. This involves connecting main and tail planes to the fuselage and adjusting any payload options. The catapult rail system also requires some light assembly.

As stated, the Orlan-10 series has been actively used in the fighting in Donbass between Russian elements and Ukrainian Army forces. Several have been claimed downed by Ukrainian forces since its use in the region began in - or around - 2014.

Content ©MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.

October 2018 - Ukrainian forces have claimed the downing of a Russian Orlan-10 UAV by a Ukrainian Mil Mi-24 attack helicopter over the Donbas region near Lysychansk. This was reported on October 15th, 2018.

July 2022 - The Orlan-30 has been unveiled, showcasing a range of up to 300 km flying at speeds of 170 kmh. The system is designed to be used in conjunction with attack aircraft, mobile artillery systems, and static artillery stations against both moving and stationary targets.

July 2022 - Myanmar has been revealed to be the first Orlan-10 UAV customer.

Power & Performance
Those special qualities that separate one aircraft design from another. Performance specifications presented assume optimal operating conditions for the STC Orlan-10 Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV).
1 x A-95 gasoline-fueled engine driving a two-bladed engine in the nose.
Propulsion
93 mph
150 kph | 81 kts
Max Speed
71 mph
115 kph | 62 kts
Cruise Speed
16,404 ft
5,000 m | 3 miles
Service Ceiling
93 miles
150 km | 81 nm
Operational Range
City-to-City Ranges
Operational range when compared to distances between major cities (in KM).
NYC
 
  LON
LON
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MOS
MOS
 
  TOK
TOK
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Structure
The nose-to-tail, wingtip-to-wingtip physical qualities of the STC Orlan-10 Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV).
0
(UNMANNED)
Crew
20 lb
(9 kg)
Empty Weight
33 lb
(15 kg)
MTOW
Design Balance
The three qualities reflected below are altitude, speed, and range. The more full the box, the more balanced the design.
RANGE
ALT
SPEED
Armament
Available supported armament and special-mission equipment featured in the design of the STC Orlan-10 Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) .
None. Mission payload consists of sensors and camera equipment.
Variants
Notable series variants as part of the STC Orlan-10 family line.
Orlan-10 - Base Series Designation.
Orlan-30 - Advanced form of 2022 with increased operational range and 170 kmh speeds.
Operators
Global customers who have evaluated and/or operated the STC Orlan-10. Nations are displayed by flag, each linked to their respective national aircraft listing.

Total Production: 1,000 Units

Contractor(s): Special Technological Centre - Russia
National flag of Myanmar National flag of Russia

[ Myanmar; Russia ]
Relative Max Speed
Hi: 100mph
Lo: 50mph
Aircraft Max Listed Speed (93mph).

Graph Average of 75 MPH.
Era Crossover
Pie graph section
Showcasing Aircraft Era Crossover (if any)
Max Alt Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Production Comparison
1000
36183
44000
Entry compared against Ilyushin IL-2 (military) and Cessna 172 (civilian) total production.
MACH Regime (Sonic)
Sub
Trans
Super
Hyper
HiHyper
ReEntry
RANGES (MPH) Subsonic: <614mph | Transonic: 614-921 | Supersonic: 921-3836 | Hypersonic: 3836-7673 | Hi-Hypersonic: 7673-19180 | Reentry: >19030
Aviation Timeline
EarlyYrs
WWI
Interwar
WWII
ColdWar
Postwar
Modern
Future
1 / 5
Image of the STC Orlan-10
Image from the Russian Ministry of Defense.
2 / 5
Image of the STC Orlan-10
Image from the Russian Ministry of Defense.
3 / 5
Image of the STC Orlan-10
Image from the Russian Ministry of Defense.
4 / 5
Image of the STC Orlan-10
Image from the Russian Ministry of Defense.
5 / 5
Image of the STC Orlan-10
Image from the Russian Ministry of Defense.

Mission Roles
Some designs are single-minded in their approach while others offer a more versatile solution to airborne requirements.
RECONNAISSANCE
UNMANNED
Recognition
Some designs stand the test of time while others are doomed to never advance beyond the drawing board; let history be their judge.
Going Further...
The STC Orlan-10 Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) appears in the following collections:
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