×
Aircraft / Aviation Vehicles & Artillery Infantry Arms Warships & Submarines Military Pay Scale Military Ranks
HOME
AIRCRAFT / AVIATION
MODERN AIR FORCES
COUNTRIES
MANUFACTURERS
COMPARE
BY CONFLICT
BY TYPE
BY DECADE
WORLD WAR 2
X-PLANE

Rikugun Ki-93


Heavy Fighter / Anti-Shipping Attack Aircraft Prototype (1945)


Aviation / Aerospace

1 / 1
Image copyright www.MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.

Jump-to: Specifications

Intended for the Imperial Japanese Army of World War 2, the Rikugun Ki-93 heavy fighter only saw one completed prototype before the end, a second laying unfinished.



Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 05/22/2016 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.
The heavy fighter as a military aircraft class was a constant throughout the inventories of the air services participating in World War 2. Japanese seemed to take a particular interest in the type and held a stable of several strong performers during the period while other designs either failed outright or were ultimately abandoned as the war progressed. The Rikugun Ki-93 was another entry into the category but this design only ever reached the prototype stage with one example completed and a second left unfinished by war's end.

The Ki-93 began life through an initiative by the Japanese Army Aerotechnical Research Institute in 1941. Design studies were undertaken to produce an advanced twin engine, all-metal heavy-class fighter to be powered by a pair of Mitsubishi radials and work spanned into 1943 before a contract was formally issued in February covering two prototypes and one test article.

The finalized design came to be of a conventional heavy fighter arrangement: a slim fuselage would feature a crew of two in tandem (back-to-back) sitting under a heavily-glazed canopy, engines mounted under low-set monoplane wing assemblies, and a "tail dragger" undercarriage used. The tail unit was traditional with its single fin and low-mounted stabilizers. Both the cockpit and wing mainplanes were affixed ahead of midships. Overall dimensions included a length of 46.7 feet, a wingspan of 62.3 feet and a height of 16 feet. Empty weight was 17,000 lb against a gross weight of 25,220 lb.
Power was to come from 2 x Mitsubishi Ha-211 18-cylinder twin-row radial piston engines each delivering 1,970 horsepower on take-off and driving six-bladed propellers. These were fitted to underslung nacelles protruding from the wing leading edges. Performance specifications indicated a sound aircraft for the period with a maximum speed of 388 miles per hour, a cruising speed of 215 miles per hour, a range out to 1,865 miles and a service ceiling of 39,535 feet. Performance was only a key concern for the low-to-medium flight envelopes expected of the machine for its attack role. For this reason, the cockpit section was also armored.

Intended armament for the type was a single 57mm Ho-402 cannon set within a ventral gondola and 2 x 20mm Ho-5 cannons fitted to the wing roots. For defense against trailing interceptors, the rear crewman managed a 12.7mm Ho-103 heavy machine gun on a trainable mount.

Beyond the basic "Ki-93-Ia" heavy fighter / bomber destroyer version planned, there was also a proposed anti-shipping variant as the "Ki-93-Ib" It would carry a 75mm cannon (in the ventral gondola) as well as support 2 x 550lb conventional drop bombs. It is conceivable that both forms would ultimately support launch rails for rockets given their dedicated attack roles.

Completed in March of 1945, first flight of the initial Ki-93 prototype was finally had on April 8th. By this time it was obvious that the Ki-93 had been in development for far too long considering the worsening war situation for Japan - the war had now turned into a defensive one in nature. The twenty minute test flight over Tachikawa Airfield involving two crewmembers ended with a crash as the aircraft hit ahead of the runway, damaging the portside undercarriage, engine and propeller. While the crew escaped, the damage was such that it delayed the program some four weeks as repairs were undertaken. To add further woe to its development phase, an Allied air raid destroyed the Ki-93's hangar - helping to end the project prematurely. The second prototype under construction was never made ready before the end of the war as equipment was still being fitted.

Specifications



Service Year
1945

Origin
Imperial Japan national flag graphic
Imperial Japan

Crew
2

Production
1
UNITS


Army Aerotechnical Research Institute - Imperial Japan
National flag of modern Japan Imperial Japan (cancelled)
(OPERATORS list includes past, present, and future operators when applicable)
Air-to-Air Combat, Fighter
General ability to actively engage other aircraft of similar form and function, typically through guns, missiles, and/or aerial rockets.
Close-Air Support (CAS)
Developed to operate in close proximity to active ground elements by way of a broad array of air-to-ground ordnance and munitions options.
Special-Mission: Anti-Ship
Equipped to search, track, and engage enemy surface elements through visual acquisition, radar support, and onboard weaponry.
X-Plane (Developmental, Prototype, Technology Demonstrator)
Aircraft developed for the role of prototyping, technology demonstration, or research / data collection.


Length
46.7 ft
(14.22 m)
Width/Span
62.3 ft
(19.00 m)
Height
15.9 ft
(4.85 m)
Empty Wgt
16,954 lb
(7,690 kg)
MTOW
25,221 lb
(11,440 kg)
Wgt Diff
+8,267 lb
(+3,750 kg)
(Showcased structural values pertain to the base Rikugun Ki-93 production variant)
Installed: 2 x Mitsubishi Ha-214 18-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines developing 1,970 horsepower each (take-off power).
Max Speed
388 mph
(625 kph | 337 kts)
Ceiling
39,534 ft
(12,050 m | 7 mi)
Range
1,864 mi
(3,000 km | 5,556 nm)
Rate-of-Climb
2,140 ft/min
(652 m/min)


♦ MACH Regime (Sonic)
Sub
Trans
Super
Hyper
HiHyper
ReEntry
RANGES (MPH) Subsonic: <614mph | Transonic: 614-921 | Supersonic: 921-3836 | Hypersonic: 3836-7673 | Hi-Hypersonic: 7673-19180 | Reentry: >19030


(Showcased performance specifications pertain to the base Rikugun Ki-93 production variant. Compare this aircraft entry against any other in our database. View aircraft by powerplant type)
Ki-93-Ia Bomber Destroyer:
1 x 57mm Ho-402 cannon in ventral gondola structure
2 x 20mm Ho-5 cannon in wing roots
1 x 12.7mm Ho-103 machine gun on trainable mounting in rear cockpit.

Ki-93-Ib Anti-Shipping Variant:
1 x 75mm cannon in ventral gondola
2 x 550lb conventional drop bombs


Supported Types


Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Graphical image of an aircraft heavy machine gun
Graphical image of an aircraft automatic cannon
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Graphical image of an aircraft anti-ship missile


(Not all ordnance types may be represented in the showcase above)
Hardpoint Mountings: 0


Ki-93 - Base Series Designation; one prototype complete
Ki-93-Ia - Heavy Fighter variant armed with 1 x 57mm cannon in ventral gondola and 2 x 20mm cannons in wing roots.
Ki-93-Ib - Anti-Shipping variant armed with 1 x 75mm cannon in ventral gondola; support for 2 x 550 lb bombs.


Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft


Ribbon graphics not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective aerial campaigns / operations / aviation periods.

Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Cookies


2021 Military Pay Scale Army Ranks Navy Ranks Air Force Ranks Alphabet Code DoD Dictionary American War Deaths French Military Victories Vietnam War Casualties

The "Military Factory" name and MilitaryFactory.com logo are registered ® U.S. trademarks protected by all applicable domestic and international intellectual property laws. All written content, illustrations, and photography are unique to this website (unless where indicated) and not for reuse/reproduction in any form. Material presented throughout this website is for historical and entertainment value only and should not to be construed as usable for hardware restoration, maintenance, or general operation. We do not sell any of the items showcased on this site. Please direct all other inquiries to militaryfactory AT gmail.com.

Part of a network of sites that includes GlobalFirepower, a data-driven property used in ranking the top military powers of the world, WDMMA.org, the World Directory of Modern Military Aircraft, and SR71blackbird.org, detailing the history of the world's most iconic spyplane.


Facebook Logo YouTube Logo

www.MilitaryFactory.com • All Rights Reserved • Content ©2003-