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Bristol F.2


Fighter / Armed Reconnaissance / Light Bomber Aircraft


United Kingdom | 1917



"It was not until pilots began flying their two-seat F.2's as single-seat fighters that the type saw success in The Great War."

Power & Performance
Those special qualities that separate one aircraft design from another. Performance specifications presented assume optimal operating conditions for the Bristol F.2B Fighter / Armed Reconnaissance / Light Bomber Aircraft.
1 x Rolls Royce Falcon III inline piston engine developing 275 horsepower driving a two-bladed propeller unit at the nose.
Propulsion
123 mph
198 kph | 107 kts
Max Speed
17,995 ft
5,485 m | 3 miles
Service Ceiling
368 miles
593 km | 320 nm
Operational Range
869 ft/min
265 m/min
Rate-of-Climb
Structure
The nose-to-tail, wingtip-to-wingtip physical qualities of the Bristol F.2B Fighter / Armed Reconnaissance / Light Bomber Aircraft.
2
(MANNED)
Crew
25.8 ft
7.87 m
O/A Length
39.2 ft
(11.96 m)
O/A Width
9.7 ft
(2.97 m)
O/A Height
2,150 lb
(975 kg)
Empty Weight
3,250 lb
(1,474 kg)
MTOW
Armament
Available supported armament and special-mission equipment featured in the design of the Bristol F.2 Fighter / Armed Reconnaissance / Light Bomber Aircraft .
STANDARD:
1 x 7.7mm Vickers machine gun synchronized to fire through the spinning propeller blades.
1 OR 2 7.7mm Lewis Machine Gun(s) on trainable in rear cockpit.
Variants
Notable series variants as part of the Bristol F.2 family line.
R.2A - Originally Planned Reconnaissance Model' fitted with Beardmore 120hp engine.
R.2B - Sesquiplane Revision; smaller design that the R.2A fitted with Hispano-Suiza engine.
R.2B - Revision of the R.2B fitted with a Rolls-Royce Falcon series 190hp engine.
F.2A - Reclassification of all R.2 series aircraft; initial 50 example production models.
F.2B - Improved ruggedness and field of vision; modifications throughout; more powerful Rolls-Royce Falcon engines (275 horsepower).
F.2B Mk II - "Tropicalized" Variant for hot weather operations, particularly in the Middle East.
F.2B Mk III - Reinforced Model
F.2B Mk IV - Converted Mk III models with further strengthening of structure and landing gear systems; balanced rudder system implemented; automatic leading-edge slots introduced.
F.2C - Experimental Engine Platform(s)


Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 02/14/2022 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site; No A.I. was used in the generation of this content.

The Bristol F.2 fighter series operated throughout the British Empire for decades, serving through World War 1 and through the interwar years. The system proved a viable fighter platform despite its origination as a reconnaissance aircraft consisting of a two-man crew. The biplane provided the Allies with a surefire response to the ever increasing lethality of the German types they faced. In the end, the F.2 series would be heralded as the best two-seat fighter platform of the entire conflict.

Initially, the aircraft was on the drawing boards as the R.2A reconnaissance plane with a Beardmore 120 horsepower engine in mind and staggered yet equal span wings were connected via pairs of parallel struts. Surplus of the Hispano-Suiza 150 horsepower engine forced a revision in the original thinking and produced the R.2B, this design featuring a sesquiplane wing arrangement with the lower span shorter than the upper. This particular model was also further developed to accept the Rolls-Royce Falcon type engines producing some 190 horsepower. The new powerplant now added crucial power the now redesignated F.2A airframe. F.2A's were delivered in a first batch of 50 aircraft.

In configuration, the pilot sat just behind and below the upper wing with a view over the long engine compartment. His observer - or rear gunner - took the second cockpit position with his single or dual trainable 7.7mm Lewis type machine gun(s). The pilot himself operated a single forward-firing synchronized Vickers machine gun affixed to the upper fuselage. A bomb load of up to 240lb was possible. Construction consisted of a wooden structure covered over with fabric.

Initial use of the F.2 proved awful as pilots were trained to put too much emphasis on providing better arcs of fire for their rear gunners - that a flight of multiple F.2's could work in conjunction on creating an impenetrable rear quadrant governed by their machine guns. This inevitably led to disastrous results. In one such early instance, six F.2's faced off against six (some sources state five) lethal Albatros D.III fighters - the result was four of the F.2's were lost to enemy fire. The F.2 would not see its "true" value in a dogfight until tactics were revised and pilots were allowed to treat their mounts as single-seat fighters - utilizing the aircraft's impressive speed and maneuverability as their primary tool in conjunction with their forward-firing machine gun - and relying on the rear gunner as an added bonus to the aircraft's rear defense. Once this melding of man and machine was achieved, the F.2 went on to become one of the more successful fighter designs of the war.

The F.2B followed as a further development of the F.2A - in all actuality it became the definitive model in the series. The B model featured a more powerful engine - the Rolls-Royce Falcon III water-cooled inline engine offering up 275 horsepower. Other subtle improvements led to better crew protection and fields of view. This model proved so successful, in fact, that it made up the rest of the entire F.2 series production line - outnumbering the preceding A-models by a hefty sum.

First flight of the series was achieved on September 9th, 1916 with operational service being achieved in February of 1917. Production numbered some 5,300 examples and use of the type (amazingly) covered 1916 through 1932. Operators ranged from North American to South America, Europe and Australia. Design of the F.2 was handled by Frank Barnwell with production at Bristol, Armstrong Whitworth and Standard Motors among others.

Content ©MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
Operators
Global customers who have evaluated and/or operated the Bristol F.2. Nations are displayed by flag, each linked to their respective national aircraft listing.

Total Production: 5,308 Units

Contractor(s): British and Colonial Aeroplane Company / Bristol Aeroplane Company / Standard Motors / Armstrong Whitworth / Cunard Steamship Company - UK
National flag of Afghanistan National flag of Australia National flag of Belgium National flag of Canada National flag of Greece National flag of Ireland National flag of Mexico National flag of New Zealand National flag of Norway National flag of Peru National flag of Poland National flag of Spain National flag of Sweden National flag of the United Kingdom

[ Afghanistan; Australia; Belgium; Canada; Ireland; Greece; Mexico; New Zealand; Norway; Peru; Poland; Spain; Sweden; United Kingdom ]
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Image of the Bristol F.2
High angled right side view of the Bristol F.2 fighter in flight
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Image of the Bristol F.2
Photo from the personal collection of Larry M. via email; Used with Permission.

Similar
Developments of similar form-and-function, or related, to the Bristol F.2.
Going Further...
The Bristol F.2 Fighter / Armed Reconnaissance / Light Bomber Aircraft appears in the following collections:
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