×
Aviation & Aerospace - Airpower 2024 - Aircraft by Country - Aircraft Manufacturers Vehicles & Artillery - Armor 2024 - Armor by Country - Armor Manufacturers Infantry Small Arms - Warfighter 2024 - Small Arms by Country - Arms Manufacturers Warships & Submarines - Navies 2024 - Ships by Country - Shipbuilders U.S. Military Pay 2024 Military Ranks Special Forces by Country

Yakovlev Yak-52


Primary Trainer / Light Ground Attack Aircraft


Soviet Union | 1979



"The Yakovlev Yak-52 basic two-seat trainer was developed from the preceding Yak-50 series of one-seat airframes."



Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 01/19/2023 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site; No A.I. was used in the generation of this content.
In the latter stages of the Cold War (1947-1991), the Soviet Air Force relied on the Yakovlev Yak-52 to fulfill the primary trainer role. This all-metal aircraft followed conventional design wisdom as primary trainers went, seating its crew of two in tandem (under a framed canopy), showcasing straight monoplane wings, and driven by a propeller at the nose. After the fall of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, the Yak-52's value to the new Russian Air Force dwindled and stocks of the aircraft witnessed export to former Soviet allies and private buyers. About 1,800 were produced by the Soviets with some license production having been had in Romania (Aerostar). A first-flight was recorded in 1976 and service entry occurred in 1979.

The Yak-52 had origins in the earlier Yak-50 product of 1975. These trainer / aerobatic aircraft appeared in 314 examples of their own and were themselves offspring of the Yak-18 line introduced in 1946. At any rate, all three of the designs shared many similarities in both form and function - they were easy to fly and relatively inexpensive to procure and maintain in the long term - true Soviet design staples. The Yak-52 was designed as a military trainer from the outset which meant greater tolerances had to be adhered to. The benefit was that, when coupled with a lightweight frame, the aircraft could also serve quite well as an aerobatics platform and racer.

Initial production yielded the basic "Yak-52" mark and these carried a Vedeneyev M-14P series 9-cylinder radial air-cooled radial piston engines of 360 horsepower driving a two-bladed propeller unit at the nose. A ground-attack model was formed from this framework as the "Yak-52B" and these could be armed through 2 x UB-32-57 series rocket pods (32 rockets each) for ground target saturation. The Yak-52 series was then modernized with the introduction of the "Yak-52M" and this form shifted the family line to using the Vedeneyev M-14Kh radial piston engine now driving a three-bladed propeller unit. In addition to this, the M-models were given upgraded avionics.

Romania went on to produce the product (legally, under license) under its Aerostar brand label and these aircraft are designated "Iak-52". A "westernized" version of the product emerged known under the name of "Condor" and it was powered by an American Lycoming O-540 series engine. The "Iak-52W", another western-minded variant, is powered by either the M-14P or M-14Kh engine and its cockpit sports western-style gauges. The "Iak-52TW" follows suit though with newer wings and extra internal fuel. It also has a tailwheel as opposed to a nosewheel.

Operators of the Yak-52 have included Armenia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Georgia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Russia (Soviet Union), Ukraine, Turkmenistan and Vietnam. Some of these powers still actively field the type.

As built, the Yak-52 was given a length of 25.4 feet, a wingspan of 30.6 feet and a height of 8.10 feet. Empty weight was 2,240lb against an MTOW of 2,900lb. The M-14P engine provided a maximum speed of 177 mph, a cruise speed of 118 mph and a range out to 340 miles. The aircraft's service ceiling neared 13,125 feet and rate-of-climb was 1,380 feet-per-minute.


Content ©MilitaryFactory.com; No Reproduction Permitted.
Power & Performance
Those special qualities that separate one aircraft design from another. Performance specifications presented assume optimal operating conditions for the Yakovlev Yak-52 Primary Trainer / Light Ground Attack Aircraft.
1 x Vedeneyev M-14P 9-cylinder radial piston engine developing 360 horsepower.
Propulsion
177 mph
285 kph | 154 kts
Max Speed
13,123 ft
4,000 m | 2 miles
Service Ceiling
342 miles
550 km | 297 nm
Operational Range
1,380 ft/min
421 m/min
Rate-of-Climb
City-to-City Ranges
Operational range when compared to distances between major cities (in KM).
NYC
 
  LON
LON
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MOS
MOS
 
  TOK
TOK
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Structure
The nose-to-tail, wingtip-to-wingtip physical qualities of the Yakovlev Yak-52 Primary Trainer / Light Ground Attack Aircraft.
2
(MANNED)
Crew
25.4 ft
7.74 m
O/A Length
30.5 ft
(9.30 m)
O/A Width
8.9 ft
(2.70 m)
O/A Height
2,238 lb
(1,015 kg)
Empty Weight
2,877 lb
(1,305 kg)
MTOW
Design Balance
The three qualities reflected below are altitude, speed, and range. The more full the box, the more balanced the design.
RANGE
ALT
SPEED
Armament
Available supported armament and special-mission equipment featured in the design of the Yakovlev Yak-52 Primary Trainer / Light Ground Attack Aircraft .
Usually none. Ground attack variant can sport 2 x 32-shot UB-32-57 rocket pods.
Variants
Notable series variants as part of the Yakovlev Yak-52 family line.
Yak-52 - Base Series Designation
Yak-52M - Modernized model of 2003
Iak-52 - Romanian designation of Yak-52 system
Iak-52W - Westernized version; M-14P or M-14Kh engines; western-style instrument panel.
Iak-52TW - Westernized version; M-14P or M-14Kh engines; tail wheel unit replaces nose wheel; new wings; fully retractable main legs; increased internal fuel tanks.
AeroStar "Condor" - Westernized version with Lycoming O-540 engine.
Operators
Global customers who have evaluated and/or operated the Yakovlev Yak-52. Nations are displayed by flag, each linked to their respective national aircraft listing.

Total Production: 1,800 Units

Contractor(s): Yakovlev - Soviet Union / Russia; AeroStar - Romania
National flag of Armenia National flag of Belarus National flag of Bulgaria National flag of Georgia National flag of Hungary National flag of Latvia National flag of Lithuania National flag of Romania National flag of Russia National flag of the Soviet Union National flag of Turkmenistan National flag of Vietnam

[ Armenia; Belarus; Bulgaria; Georgia; Hungary; Latvia; Lithuania; Romania; Russia; Soviet Union; Turkmenistan; Vietnam ]
Relative Max Speed
Hi: 200mph
Lo: 100mph
Aircraft Max Listed Speed (177mph).

Graph Average of 150 MPH.
Era Crossover
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Showcasing Aircraft Era Crossover (if any)
Max Alt Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Production Comparison
1800
36183
44000
Entry compared against Ilyushin IL-2 (military) and Cessna 172 (civilian) total production.
MACH Regime (Sonic)
Sub
Trans
Super
Hyper
HiHyper
ReEntry
RANGES (MPH) Subsonic: <614mph | Transonic: 614-921 | Supersonic: 921-3836 | Hypersonic: 3836-7673 | Hi-Hypersonic: 7673-19180 | Reentry: >19030
Aviation Timeline
EarlyYrs
WWI
Interwar
WWII
ColdWar
Postwar
Modern
Future
1 / 4
Image of the Yakovlev Yak-52
Image from the US DoD imagery database; Public Release.
2 / 4
Image of the Yakovlev Yak-52
Image from the US DoD imagery database; Public Release.
3 / 4
Image of the Yakovlev Yak-52
Image from the US DoD imagery database; Public Release.
4 / 4
Image of the Yakovlev Yak-52
Image from the US DoD imagery database; Public Release.

Mission Roles
Some designs are single-minded in their approach while others offer a more versatile solution to airborne requirements.
GROUND ATTACK
CLOSE-AIR SUPPORT
TRAINING
Recognition
Some designs stand the test of time while others are doomed to never advance beyond the drawing board; let history be their judge.
Going Further...
The Yakovlev Yak-52 Primary Trainer / Light Ground Attack Aircraft appears in the following collections:
HOME
AVIATION INDEX
AIRCRAFT BY COUNTRY
AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURERS
COMPARE AIRCRAFT
AIRCRAFT BY CONFLICT
AIRCRAFT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT BY DECADE
COLD WAR AIRCRAFT
MODERN AIRCRAFT
Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Cookies

2024 Military Pay Scale Military Ranks U.S. DoD Dictionary Conversion Calculators Military Alphabet Code Military Map Symbols US 5-Star Generals WW2 Weapons by Country

The "Military Factory" name and MilitaryFactory.com logo are registered ® U.S. trademarks protected by all applicable domestic and international intellectual property laws. All written content, illustrations, and photography are unique to this website (unless where indicated) and not for reuse/reproduction in any form. Material presented throughout this website is for historical and entertainment value only and should not to be construed as usable for hardware restoration, maintenance, or general operation. We do not sell any of the items showcased on this site. Please direct all other inquiries to militaryfactory AT gmail.com. No A.I. was used in the generation of this content.

Part of a network of sites that includes Global Firepower, WDMMA.org, WDMMW.org, and World War Next.


©2024 www.MilitaryFactory.com • All Rights Reserved • Content ©2003-2024 (21yrs)