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Fokker T.IX

Medium Bomber Aircraft

Fokker T.IX

Medium Bomber Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The German invasion of the Netherlands in 1940 cancelled all further development of the Fokker T.IX program.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Netherlands
YEAR: 1939
MANUFACTURER(S): Fokker - Netherlands
PRODUCTION: 1
OPERATORS: Netherlands (cancelled)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Fokker T.IX model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 6
LENGTH: 54.13 feet (16.5 meters)
WIDTH: 81.04 feet (24.7 meters)
HEIGHT: 16.73 feet (5.1 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 14,330 pounds (6,500 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 24,692 pounds (11,200 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Bristol Hercules 14-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines developing 1,375 horsepower each.
SPEED (MAX): 273 miles-per-hour (440 kilometers-per-hour; 238 knots)
RANGE: 1,690 miles (2,720 kilometers; 1,469 nautical miles)
CEILING: 26,247 feet (8,000 meters; 4.97 miles)




ARMAMENT



PROPOSED:
1 x 20mm cannon in nose position
2 x 0.50 cal heavy machine guns in dorsal position
2 x 0.50 cal heavy machine guns in ventral position

OPTIONAL:
Up to 4,400lb of internally-held ordnance (conventional drop bombs).
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• T.IX - Base Series Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Fokker T.IX Medium Bomber Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 7/25/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Netherlands was one of the many nations that ultimately fell to the German-led Axis onslaught concerning World War 2 (1939-1945). Despite this, the Dutch held a healthy aero-industry prior to the war that produced several local results such as the D.XXI monoplane fighter, the G.I "Reaper" twin-engined heavy fighter and the T.V bomber-interceptor - all by Fokker. Fokker had been making airplanes since before the start of World War 1 (1914-1918) when it was founded in 1912 and went on to deliver some of the more iconic German Empire aircraft of the First World War.

One entry by Fokker for The Netherlands in World War 2 became the "T.IX", a twin-engined bomber intended for the Royal Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force (RNEIAAF). For its time, it was to become the concern's first attempt at an all-metal-skinned bomber and further modern features included wholly-enclosed crew positions and a retractable undercarriage (save for the tailwheel). Design work began in 1938.

The end-result was a well-streamlined aircraft utilizing a stepped cockpit arrangement with a glazed nose position and heavily-framed cockpit section. The fuselage had slab sides and tapered sharply to form the empennage and to this tail stem were added horizontal planes, each holding a vertical tailplane. The wing mainplanes were mid-mounted appendages fitted to the sides of the fuselage and each given a single engine nacelle. Its placement along the leading wing edges made for easy inspection of the powerplants by the crew while airborne. Power was from 2 x Bristol "Hercules" 14-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines developing 1,375 horsepower each and driving three-bladed propeller units.

Armament was to comprise 1 x 20mm cannon in the nose section, 2 x 0.50 caliber Heavy Machine Guns (HMGs) at a fuselage dorsal position and 2 x 0.50 caliber HMGs in a similar, though ventral, fuselage position. An internal bomb bay was to allot for up to 4,410lb of conventional drop ordnance.

The completed prototype went airborne for the first time on September 11th, 1939. However, students of history will note the German invasion of Poland began on September 1st of that year, officially beginning World War 2. Amidst the backdrop of total war, Fokker continued development of what became the T.IX bomber and flew the prototype several more times. However, in April of 1940 the program ran into a snag when the aircraft hit a hangar door and, on May 10th, all hope was lost when the Germans began their invasion of The Netherlands - this effectively ending all development on the promising T.IX program.

The few performance specifications that were detailed from the prototype during its short time aloft included a maximum speed of 275 miles per hour, a range out to 1,700 miles and a service ceiling of 26,250 feet.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 300mph
Lo: 150mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (273mph).

    Graph average of 225 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Fokker T.IX's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1
1

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


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Supported Arsenal
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