Military Factory logo
Icon of a dollar sign
Icon of military officer saluting
Icon of F-15 Eagle military combat fighter aircraft
Icon of Abrams Main Battle Tank
Icon of AK-47 assault rifle
Icon of navy warships

Messerschmitt Me 209-II

Fighter Prototype

Messerschmitt Me 209-II

Fighter Prototype

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Messerschmitt Me 209-II was designed as a possible replacement for the hugely popular Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter series of the German Luftwaffe during World War 2.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Nazi Germany
YEAR: 1943
MANUFACTURER(S): Messerschmitt - Germay
PRODUCTION: 4
OPERATORS: Nazi Germany
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Messerschmitt Me 209-II V5 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 31.96 feet (9.74 meters)
WIDTH: 35.93 feet (10.95 meters)
HEIGHT: 13.12 feet (4 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 7,361 pounds (3,339 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 9,006 pounds (4,085 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Daimler-Benz DB 603G piston engine developing 1,900 horsepower.
SPEED (MAX): 421 miles-per-hour (678 kilometers-per-hour; 366 knots)
CEILING: 36,089 feet (11,000 meters; 6.84 miles)




ARMAMENT



PROPOSED (V5 Prototype):
1 x 30mm MK 108 cannon in propeller hub
2 x 13mm MG 131 machine guns in wing roots

ALTERNATIVE (V6 Prototype):
1 x 30mm MK 108 cannon in propeller hub
2 x 20mm MG 151/20 cannons in wings
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Me 209 V5 - Fitting 1 x 30mm MK 108 cannon in propeller hub and 2 x 13mm MG 131 machine guns in wing roots.
• Me 209 V6 - Fitted with Jumo 213 series engine; armament of 20mm MG 151/20 cannons.
• Me 209H V1 - Proposed High-Altitude Variant; increased wingspan; fitted with Daimler-Benz DB 603 series engine; based on the P.1091B high performance fighter.
• Me 109L - Developmental Designation after project cancellation.
• Me 209 A1 - Planned production fighter designation; to be fitted with DB 603G engines based on the V5 prototype.
• Me 209 A2 - Planned production fighter designation; to be fitted with Jumo 213E engines based on the V6 prototype.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Messerschmitt Me 209-II Fighter Prototype.  Entry last updated on 8/25/2015. Authored by Dan Alex. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Messerschmitt Me 209-II was a proposed successor to the far-reaching Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter. The Bf 109 was the standard German Luftwaffe fighter of World War 2 and developed quite a reputation during the conflict, lasting from beginning to end and appearing in multiple variants numbering some 33,000 production examples in whole. Much thought was given to making the new Me 209-II compatible with the existing BF 109 airframes, leading perhaps to some potential benefits during production and in-the-field fixes. As fate would have it, the Me 209-II suffered through its development process and the end-product was no better than the available fighter systems already in circulation. In all, only four Me 209-II prototypes were known to have been constructed before project's end.

A Note About the Me 209 Designation

While the "Me 209" designation was used before to cover the high-performance race plane series of 1938, the designation was also used for Messerschmitt's fighter prototype intended to replace the BF 109 and is oft-noted by a "II" or "2" to signify this difference. The two aircraft have little relation to one another except in manufacturer. The original Me 209 racer was not modified for combat nor was there thought to such action while the Me 209-II was very much a fighter thoroughbred at heart.

The Challenge

Messerschmitt had stuck gold with its all-metal BF 109 fighter series debuting in the Spanish Civil War. The aircraft featured a retractable undercarriage and an enclosed cockpit - quite novel concepts for 1930s fighter design. While the fighter was an excellent system for its time, it was still a design based in past thinking and its limitations during a modern war was beginning to show. Both Messerschmitt and Focke-Wulf looked to supply an answer for the burgeoning RLM (Air Ministry) need. Willy Messerschmitt penciled out a possible successor in his Me 209-II while Focke-Wulf put forth its wide-span Ta 152 and Fw 190D-9 fighter developments. All three combat systems were modified forms of their respective airframe origins to help ease impending production commitments. The Me 209-II borrowed heavily from the BF-109G model while the Fw 109D-9 and Ta 152 were both based on the successful Fw 190 fighter airframe.

Messerschmitt Me 209-II Walk-Around

The Me 209-II maintained its obvious resemblance to the BF 109, in particular was its retention of the squared-off canopy. An all-new tail section was constructed and commonality of parts with the BF 109 (the BF 109 G-5 to be exact) was approximately 65%. The cockpit was set just forward of fuselage center and there was a raised "spine" obstructing the view to the "six". The engine was held within an elongated forward compartment and powered a three-blade propeller capped by a rounded spinner. The fuselage, as a whole, was a streamlined affair and appeared something akin to a thin flying pencil - though cleanly contoured and tampered off at the extreme aft end. Wings were low-mounted cantilever monoplane assemblies set under and forward of the cockpit floor with slight dihedral (upwards angle). The empennage was conventional, fitting a single vertical tail fin with a rounded top edge and applicable horizontal planes. The wide-track undercarriage was also conventional - giving the name to these sorts of aircraft as "tail draggers" - with single-wheeled main landing gear legs under each wing and a diminutive tail wheel under the empennage. The main legs retracted towards centerline.

Powerplant and Armament

While the Daimler-Benz DB 603A inline piston engine was intended to be used in the Me 209-II production form, its limited availability meant that a Junkers Jumo 213A series was also utilized during development. The selection of the Junkers engine led to some redesigning of the forward engine compartment and the applicable cooling system. Armament was much like the Bf 109, a combination of cannon and machine guns. Armament was fitted to the V5 prototype that included a 1 x 30mm MK 108 series cannon firing through the propeller hub and 2 x 13mm MG 131 machine guns in the wing roots. Only the follow-up V6 prototype varied this by replacing the MG 131 systems with a pair of 20mm MG 151/20 cannons. The V5 prototype achieved first flight on November 3rd, 1943, this fitting the Daimler-Benz 603A engine. A later upgrade fitted a Daimler-Benz DB 603G instead. The V6 prototype appeared in December of 1943 with first flight achieved sometime in April of 1944.

The End Draws Near

Despite the promising specifications, the Me 209-II proved no faster than the FW 190D-9. In fact, the Messerschmitt design recorded 31 miles per hour slower than the competing FW 190. To add insult to injury, there was nothing much in the way of handling benefits with the revised BF 109 airframe, working against any thought of furthering the Messerschmitt project in the least. Maximum speed was estimated at 423 miles per hour with a service ceiling equal to 36,000 feet. As such, the Me 209-II was cancelled in 1944 though Messerschmitt would continue its private development under the designation of "Me 109L" for a time.

Proposed Me 209-II Forms

Two production forms of the Me 209-II were planned and designated simply as "A1" and "A2". These differed slightly and were separated only by their selection of powerplant. The A1 would have been based on the V5 prototype fitting the Daimler-Benz DB 603G engine while the A2 would have been based on the V6 prototype fitting the Junkers Jumo 213E engine. As can be surmised, neither form was ever constructed let alone produced in any quantity. The Me 209H V1 designation was reserved for a proposed high-altitude form with a wider wingspan and a Daimler-Benz DB 603 engine.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 500mph
Lo: 250mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (421mph).

    Graph average of 375 miles-per-hour.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
4
4

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.