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Dassault Rafale

France (2001)

Detailing the development and operational history of the Dassault Rafale Multirole 4th Generation Fighter Aircraft.

 Entry last updated on 4/14/2018; Authored by Staff Writer; Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com



  Dassault Rafale  
Picture of Dassault Rafale Multirole 4th Generation Fighter Aircraft


The primary French multi-role fighter is the sleek Dassault Rafale which has recently seen a spike in foreign interest.

The Dassault Rafale is the primary French multirole 4th Generation Fighter aircraft. During the 1970s, it became apparent to the French Air Force and Navy that it required a new, modern, multirole-minded fighter to succeed its aged stock of aircraft. This prompted officials to consider a lower-risk partnership with other European players to include Britain, Italy, Germany (then as West Germany), and Spain. The program picked up steam in the late 1970s which led to a formal partnership. However, the French removed themselves from the project in 1984, preferring instead to develop an in-house French solution to the standing French requirement. The Rafale was already on Dassault drawing boards even as the Dassault Mirage 2000 (detailed elsewhere on this site) was being developed.

The European consortium eventually netted itself the capable Eurofighter Typhoon while work by Dassault produced the impressive Dassault Rafale. First flight of a prototype was completed on July 4th, 1986 and service introduction - originally scheduled for 1996 - was not until May 18th, 2001. At present, the Rafale is only in service with the French Air Force and Navy. India has committed to a deal involving French Rafales. The French have ordered 180 Rafale aircraft from the original intent to procure 286 airframes. Ninety-one currently serve the French Air Force with forty having been sent to the Navy.

The Rafale has been combat tested in several modern conflicts to date. Its first actions occurred over Afghanistan in support of NATO forces following the U.S. led invasion of the country. The aircraft then performed admirably over the Iraqi Theater after the Saddam Hussein ouster and was then pressed into service under the NATO banner once more when tackling Libyan Army forces during the 2011 Libyan Civil War. Its latest actions have placed it over the skies of Mali in the French intervention there against Muslim radicals attempting a national takeover. Even more recently, the Rafale has participated in allied strikes against ISIS forces in Iraq and Syria.

Since production began in 1986, some 133 Rafales have been produced though only in a few select variants. Rafale A designated the 1986 technology demonstrator which proved many concepts for the future jet sound. The Rafale B then became the primary two-seat multirole fighter model of the French Air Force. The single-seat model was the Rafale C. The Rafale M was developed exclusively for the French Navy and carrier service which included changes to the undercarriage, a strengthening of the structure, and arrestor hook equipment installed. The Rafale became an abandoned missile-only model (twin-seater) and the Rafale R existed as a proposed reconnaissance variant which never came to be.

The Rafale is an advanced fighter platform completed with lightweight-yet-strong composite materials, Fly-By-Wire (FBW) controlling, and voice input capabilities. It features an Active Electronically-Scanned Array (AESA) radar system in its nose. A canard delta-wing planform was adopted for its high tolerances and ability to showcase a plethora of hardpoints for homing, guided, and dropped ordnance. The pilot (with co-pilot in some variants) sits under a large canopy offering excellent vision out-of-the-cockpit. The tail unit incorporates a sole vertical fin atop twin engine exhaust ports. The twin engine arrangement was chosen for both power and survivability common traits of most modern multirole fighter mounts today.

The twin-engine fighter is fitted with 2 x SNECMA M88-2 afterburning turbofan engines developing 11,250 lbf of dry thrust each and up to 17,000 lbf of thrust with afterburner applied. Maximum speed reaches Mach 1.8 and ranges peak at 2,000 nautical miles with three fuel drop tanks fitted. Combat radius is 1,000 nautical miles. The aircraft's service ceiling is 50,000 feet and showcases an excellent rate-of-climb of 60,000 feet-per-minute.
Picture of the Dassault Rafale Multirole 4th Generation Fighter Aircraft
Picture of the Dassault Rafale Multirole 4th Generation Fighter Aircraft


The delta wing design, popularized by early successful Dassault aircraft ventures, was brought back into the fold with the Rafale. This time, the arrangement was complemented by two small forward canards fitted to either side of the cockpit. The addition of these minor surfaces has greatly enhanced the agility of the airframe as a whole, coupled with the already-impressive lift-and-drag balance generated by the overall design. Fuselage material construction is made up of specialized composites to assist the aircraft in maintaining the smallest of radar signatures and features a mixture of carbon and Kevlar components. Titanium and aluminum-lithium are also used in the structure where needed. The aircraft carries a Thales RBE2 radar suite, a Thales SPECTRA Electronic Warfare (EW) system, and the Thales/SAGEM-OSF Optronique Secteur Frontal Infra-Red (IR) Search and Track system.

Armament-wise, the Rafale is outfitted with a standard 30mm GIAT 30/M791 internal cannon which is afforded 125 rounds. There are fourteen external hardpoints (thirteen in the naval variant) for the carrying of air-to-air and air-to-surface ordnance including missiles, precision-guided weapons, dumb bombs, fuel tanks, and mission equipment pods (targeting pods and the like). Up to 20,900 lb of stores can be carried.

Despite only being adopted by France, Egypt, Qatar and (now probably) India, the Rafale has garnered some interest with the governments of Brazil, Canada, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Singapore, Switzerland, South Korea, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). While it has not been outright successful in any one of these bids, it had generated considerable interest. Its recent combat actions have served the product well in marketing endeavors.

In French service the series is expected to remain a frontline mainstay into the 2040s.

The Egyptian government has signed on to take delivery of 24 Rafale multirole fighters with first deliveries coming in 2015. This move marks Egypt as the first foreign operator of the Rafale as Dassault negotiations with India have hit a rough patch. The Indian order would constitute 36 total aircraft (the contract since formally agreed upon in April 2015).

In May of 2015, the government of Qatar secured an order for 24 Rafales, marking it as the third official export operator of the French multi-role fighter behind Egypt and India.

July 2015 - The first three of twenty-four Rafale fighters ordered by the Egyptian government were handed over to the Egyptian Air Force. Some of the Egyptian fleet will be pulled from Dassault lines intended for French Air Force delivery.

July 2016 - The French-Indian deal for Rafale fighter jets is reportedly in its final stages.

January 2017 - To date 154 total Rafale fighters have been built.

March 2017 - The "F4" standard was announced which will broaden networking capabilities as well as sensors and support new-generation missiles. Service introduction is scheduled for 2025.

February 2018 - The French government is to close on a plan to order more Rafale fighters for its fighter fleet. The move is to bring strength up to 225 Rafale fighter jets split between its Air Force (185) and Navy services (40). These will continue to serve alongside about 55 Mirage 2000D models. In 2023, a fifth production batch of Rafales is planned to be built around the as-yet-to-be-designed Rafale F4 mark.
Dassault Rafale C Specifications
National Flag Graphic
France
Year: 2001
Status: Active, In-Service
Type: Multirole 4th Generation Fighter Aircraft
Manufacturer(s): Dassault Aviation - France
Production: 154
Supported Mission Types
Air-to-Air
Interception
Unmanned
Ground Attack
Close-Air Support
Training
Anti-Submarine
Anti-Ship
Airborne Early Warning
MEDEVAC
Electronic Warfare
Maritime/Navy
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
Passenger Industry
VIP Travel
Business Travel
Search/Rescue
Recon/Scouting
Special Forces
X-Plane/Development
Structural
Crew: 1
Length: 50.20 ft (15.3 m)
Width: 35.76 ft (10.90 m)
Height: 17.52 ft (5.34 m)
Empty Weight: 20,944 lb (9,500 kg)
MTOW: 54,013 lb (24,500 kg)


Installed Power
2 x SNECMA M88-2 augmented turbofan engines with afterburner developing 19,555 lb of thrust.

Standard Day Performance
Maximum Speed: 1,190 mph (1,915 kph; 1,034 kts)
Maximum Range: 1,150 mi (1,850 km; 999 nm)
Service Ceiling: 49,984 ft (15,235 m; 9.47 mi)
Rate-of-Climb: 60,000 ft/min (18,288 m/min)


Armament
STANDARD:
1 x 30mm GIAT 30/M791 internal cannon

OPTIONAL:
Mission-specific armament with a maximum load of up to 20,900 lb on fourteen external hardpoints. Can include the following (or a mix of):

MBDA MICA medium-range air-to-air missiles.
MBDA Meteor long-range air-to-air missiles.
ASMP nuclear stand-off missiles
AM-39 Exocet anti-ship missiles
AS 30L laser-guided air-to-surface missiles.
APACHE stand-off munitions dispensers
Laser-Guided Bombs (Paveway/Enhanced Paveway family)
Anti-Armor munitions
Anti-Runway / runway denial munitions.
Rocket Pods
Air-Launched Cruiser Missiles (ALCMs)
3 x Jettisonable fuel drop tanks


Operators List
Egypt; France; India (probable); Qatar

Series Model Variants
• Rafale - Base Series Name
• ACX (Avion de Combat Experimentale) - Technology Demonstrator Design.
• Rafale A - Technology Demonstrator; airframe roughly 3 percent smaller than production models.
• Rafale B - Two-Seat Trainer Model; multi-role capabilities.
• Rafale BM - Proposed two-seat variant for French Navy; redesignated to Rafale N
• Rafale C - Single-Seat Air Defense Model
• Rafale D - Designation covers B and C models for French Air Force use.
• Rafale F4 - Improved advanced standard for introduction in 2025.
• Rafale M - Single-Seat Naval Variant; introduced in 2001; reinforced airframe; revised nose leg; arrestor hook equipment; increased MTOW.
• Rafale N - Proposed French Navy two-seater; since cancelled.
• Rafale R - Proposed reconnaissance variant


Supported Weapon Systems
Graphical image of an air-to-air missile weapon
Graphical image of a short-range air-to-air missile
Graphical image of a medium-range air-to-air missile
Graphical image of a long-range air-to-air missile
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Graphical image of an aircraft air-to-surface missile
Graphical image of an aircraft anti-ship missile
Graphical image of an aircraft rocket pod
Graphical image of an air launched cruise missile weapon
Graphical image of an air launched nuclear weapon
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Graphical image of an aircraft guided bomb munition
Graphical image of an aircraft external fuel tank


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