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Supermarine Stranraer

Reconnaissance Flying Boat Aircraft

Supermarine Stranraer

Reconnaissance Flying Boat Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Supermarine Stranraer was the last of the line of biplane flying boats to be accepted into service with the RAF.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United Kingdom
YEAR: 1937
MANUFACTURER(S): Supermarine - UK / Canadian Vickers - Canada
PRODUCTION: 57
OPERATORS: Canada; United Kingdom; United States (civilian)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Supermarine Stranraer model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 7
LENGTH: 54.82 feet (16.71 meters)
WIDTH: 85.01 feet (25.91 meters)
HEIGHT: 21.75 feet (6.63 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 11,250 pounds (5,103 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 18,999 pounds (8,618 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Bristol Pegasus X 9-cylinder air-cooled radial engines developing 920 horsepower each.
SPEED (MAX): 150 miles-per-hour (241 kilometers-per-hour; 130 knots)
RANGE: 1,000 miles (1,609 kilometers; 869 nautical miles)
CEILING: 18,504 feet (5,640 meters; 3.50 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 1,350 feet-per-minute (411 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



OPTIONAL:
1 x 7.7mm Lewis machine gun in bow position
1 x 7.7mm Lewis machine gun in midship dorsal position.

Up to 1,000lbs (454kg) of external stores including bombs, depth charges or mines.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Stranraer - Base Series Designation; 17 examples serving with the RAF and 40 examples produced by Canadian Vickers for the Royal Canadian Air Force.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Supermarine Stranraer Reconnaissance Flying Boat Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 10/23/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Supermarine Stranraer was the final evolution of the Supermarine Southampton which debuted in March of 1925. The original Southampton went on to have a highly successful flying career and was utilized by both military parties (Royal Air Force (RAF)) and civilian passenger airliners. The type saw some 83 examples built with service stemming into the 1930s before being replaced by modern types. The Stranraer itself was developed to Air Ministry R.24/31 Specification (as was the Saro London flying boat) which required a maritime coastal patrol platform to serve the RAF. Supermarine then secured a contract for a single prototype in 1933. The Stranraer became one of the last flying boats constructed with biplane wings.

Supermarine engineers produced a twin-engined, biplane wing design fitted atop a long fuselage with a boat-like hull for water landings. Pontoons were set under the lower wing assemblies to assist in keeping the vessel upright in choppy waters. The cockpit was completely enclosed with windows dotting the sides of the fuselage. An open-air gun emplacement was fitted at the front of the design with a second at amidships along the fuselage spine aft of the wings. Bombs, naval mines or depth charges could be held under the wings (up to 1,000lbs) for engaging sea-based targets. The empennage was capped by a single horizontal plane supporting a pair of vertical tail fins. The original prototype was given a pair of Bristol Pegasus IIIM series radial piston engines outputting at 820 horsepower each and engines were set high in the design along the leading edge of the upper wing assembly. Each engine drove a two-bladed wooden propeller. The fuselage was constructed of metal while wings were covered over in fabric - consistent with aircraft manufacture of the time, a period seeing increased use of all-metal skinned aircraft prior to World War 2. At this point in its development, the aircraft became known as the "Stranraer" after a town in southwest Scotland. First flight of the Stranraer was recorded on July 24th, 1934 to which the RAF then received a working example for formal trials.

After some requested changes were completed, the Royal Air Force officially introduced the type into service in 1937. The initial order numbered 17 aircraft and first deliveries formed with No.228 Squadron at Pembroke Dock in 1937. Production forms differed from the original prototype in that they were fielded with Bristol Pegasus X series 9-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines of 920 horsepower each due to the underpowered nature of the prototype's engine installations. The engines now drove more modern three-bladed metal propellers. The Stranraer was crewed by up to seven personnel and armed with 2 x 7.7mm Lewis machine guns. She held a wingspan of 85 feet with a length of 54 feet, 9 inches. Maximum speed was 165 miles per hour with a range of 1,000 miles - able to operate at ceilings of 18,500 feet. Once in circulation, RAF crews found the type to be slow and many unappealing nicknames for the mount soon emerged. Regardless, the new aircraft served in the all-important anti-submarine coastal patrol role though none would ever see combat action in World War 2 (1939-1945). The type was withdrawn from frontline service as early as March 1941 though several remained on station as training platforms into October of 1942. British Stranraers were eventually replaced in service by the excellent American PBY Catalina series flying boats.




It was in Canadian hands (Royal Canadian Air Force) that the Stranraer would establish its more noted history as 40 examples were produced locally by Canadian Vickers Ltd and serve in a longer tenure than those of the RAF. Like the British marks, Canadian Stranraers were utilized in the anti-submarine patrol role though fielded locally along both Canadian coastlines during World War 2 (with eight being in service at the outbreak of war). Again, none were destined to see direct combat action in the conflict. Canadian Stranraers were fielded in this capacity up until February of 1945 to which examples were then passed on to interested civilian parties in Canada and the United States beginning in 1946. Militarily, the Stranraer only ever served with British and Canadian forces during her tenure and the last civilian Stranraer was retired from service in 1957. Canadian Stranraers were also replaced by American Catalinas before the end of the war.

Only a single complete Stranraer survived time and this example can be seen at the Royal Air Force Museum (London) in its full glory. The example on display is Canadian in origin - having served as a trainer, anti-submarine platform and passenger airliner throughout her long career. In all, 57 Stranraers were produced.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 150mph
Lo: 75mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (150mph).

    Graph average of 112.5 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
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  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
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  MSK
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  TKY
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  SYD
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  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Supermarine Stranraer's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Pie graph section
Pie graph section
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Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
57
57

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue