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WORLD WAR 1


Sopwith Snipe


Single-Seat Biplane Fighter Aircraft


The Sopwith Snipe was an evolved form of the successful war-winning Sopwith Camel design - though not appearing until the final weeks of World War 1.
Authored By: Staff Writer | Edited: 11/9/2016
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Specifications


Year: 1918
Manufacturer(s): Sopwith Aviation Company - United Kingdom
Production: 497
Capabilities: Fighter;
Crew: 1
Length: 19.75 ft (6.02 m)
Width: 30.09 ft (9.17 m)
Height: 8.76 ft (2.67 m)
Weight (Empty): 1,323 lb (600 kg)
Weight (MTOW): 2,028 lb (920 kg)
Power: 1 x Bentley B.R.2 rotary piston engine developing 230 horsepower.
Speed: 121 mph (195 kph; 105 kts)
Ceiling: 19,521 feet (5,950 m; 3.7 miles)
Range: 364 miles (585 km; 316 nm)
Rate-of-Climb: 1,300 ft/min (396 m/min)
Operators: Australia; Brazil; Canada; Soviet Union; United Kingdom
The Sopwith Snipe took all of the components that had made the Sopwith Camel a legend in the middle years of World War 1 and introduced several new features that made this new design the most formidable Allied fighter. Appearing with just eight weeks left in the conflict, the Sopwith Snipe would nevertheless prove its worth against the very best Fokker designs available. In the end, the Herbert Smith-designed Snipe would continue to serve the Royal Air Force (RAF) in large capacity, surviving well into the inter-war years.

Externally, the Snipe took on the basic design of the Camel with a traditional biplane wing structure, fixed landing gear and single pilot seating. Armament consisted of two 7.7mm synchronized machine guns firing in a fixed-forward position. Where the Snipe stood out above its predecessor was internally, featuring an all-new more powerful engine, integrated oxygen and heating systems allowing the aircraft to fly higher and with a better straight-line speed. Power for the Snipe was derived from a Bentley B.R.2 rotary piston engine, delivering some 230 horsepower.

The Sopwith Snipe would go on to become the Thomas Sopwith firms last production aircraft by conflicts end. Nearly 500 examples would be produced and would serve in some capacity up until 1927.






Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition

Armament



STANDARD:
2 x 7.7mm Vickers fixed, forward-firing machine guns synchronized to fire through the spinning propeller blades.

OPTIONAL:
4 x 25lb bombs underwing

Variants / Models



• Snipe - Base Series Designation
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