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Rockwell XFV-12

VTOL Carrier-based Fighter Prototype

Rockwell XFV-12

VTOL Carrier-based Fighter Prototype

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Rockwell International XFV-12 VTOL system never materialized past the prototype stage.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1977
MANUFACTURER(S): Rockwell International - USA
PRODUCTION: 1
OPERATORS: United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Rockwell XFV-12 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 43.96 feet (13.4 meters)
WIDTH: 28.51 feet (8.69 meters)
HEIGHT: 32.81 feet (10 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 13,799 pounds (6,259 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 24,251 pounds (11,000 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Pratt & Whitney F401-PW-400 augmented turbofan delivering 30,000lbf with afterburning.
SPEED (MAX): 1,591 miles-per-hour (2560 kilometers-per-hour; 1,382 knots)
CEILING: 38,999 feet (11,887 meters; 7.39 miles)




ARMAMENT



PROPOSED STANDARD:
1 x 20mm M61A1 Vulcan cannon

PROPOSED OPTIONAL:
2 x AIM-9L Sidewinder air-to-air missiles OR 4 x AIM-7 Sparrow air-to-air missiles
2 OR 4 x AIM-7 Sparrow air-to-air missiles (underfuselage)
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• XFV-12 - Base Project Series Designation
• XFV-12A - Sole Prototype Model Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Rockwell XFV-12 VTOL Carrier-based Fighter Prototype.  Entry last updated on 11/3/2014. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Rockwell XFV-12 aircraft was a proposed design attempting to fulfill a United States Navy (USN) requirement for a VTOL (Vertical Take-Off and Landing) supersonic fighter. Though a promising concept, the XFV-12 was tested in extremely limited circumstances and proved to be a failure by the early 1980's. The XFV-12 was later dropped by the United States Navy due to rising developmental costs with its official cancellation ordered in 1981. The program only ever produced a sole prototype with a second under construction at the time of termination.

Externally, the XFV-12 was certainly a futuristic-looking fighter aircraft. To speed up development and keep costs in check, the nose section of a Douglas A-4 "Skyhawk" carried-based, multi-role fighter was used along with the intake work of the McDonnell Douglas F-4 "Phantom II" multi-role fighter. This surprisingly produced a mated design whose parts made up a sound whole. One of the most characteristic design elements became the wing planform which featured a distinct rear-set mainplane assembly coupled to all-moving forward canards. The large wing area was utilized fully for the "thrust augmented" concept to which thrust could be delivered through various openings found throughout the wings and canard foreplanes.

Power was served through a single Pratt & Whitney F401-PW-400 afterburning turbofan engine. Development estimates considered the installation to provide the aircraft with enough direct lift power but the complicated internal workings of extensive ductwork eliminated much of the thrust power resulting in less-than-expected performance. Proposed armament was to consist of a single 20mm internal Gatling-style cannon for close-in work as well as a mix of air-to-air missiles - primarily the AIM-7 "Sparrow" medium-range missile and the AIM-9 "Sidewinder" short-range missile. Because of the nature of the VTOL internal working, armament hardpoints were themselves restricted to a few placements and none could be fitted under the wings - so all missiles were mounted under the fuselage mass. Such a move limited the tactical value of the XFV-12 as a carried-based fighter despite the unique VTOL capability.

With project complexity and cost overruns beginning to take their toll, the XFV-12 was cancelled by the USN. The British Hawker Siddeley remained the VTOL champion of the skies and was even adopted by the United States Marine Corps (USMC) in a rare move by an American service branch taking on a foreign frontline aircraft. While a capable attack platform with some fighter qualities, the Harrier remained a subsonic design. The VTOL mantle is expected to be taken by the upcoming Lockheed F-35 "Lightning II" VTOL variant still in development. The product represents a stealthy, 5th Generation Fighter form with advanced, inherent strike capabilities.

The hulk of the XFV-12 may someday still emerge as a preserved museum showpiece.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 1600mph
Lo: 800mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (1,591mph).

    Graph average of 1200 miles-per-hour.
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Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1
1

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an air-to-air missile weapon
Graphical image of a short-range air-to-air missile
Graphical image of a medium-range air-to-air missile
Graphical image of an aircraft Gatling-style rotating gun
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
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