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Albatros C.X

Imperial Germany (1917)

Detailing the development and operational history of the Albatros C.X Biplane Reconnaissance Aircraft.

 Entry last updated on 3/20/2016; Authored by Staff Writer; Content ©

  Albatros C.X  
Picture of Albatros C.X Biplane Reconnaissance Aircraft

The Albatros C.X paved the way for the even more effective Albatros C.XII variant.

The Albatros production of the C.X model continued the firm's commitment to producing capable reconnaissance biplane aircraft. Supplanting the earlier C-series types before it, the C.X model looked to improved upon an already successful family of aircraft by adding more in the way of aerodynamic design and improved powerplants. The result would be a good performing and longer-distance C.X, which would ultimately set the stage for the best C-series variant in the form of the C.XII.

The C.X was fitted with the powerful and newly-designed Mercedes D.IVa engine that improved performance and reliability from earlier models. The C.V variant series suffered from a less-than-reliable Mercedes design that attributed the loss of aircraft more to accident than enemy fire. The resulting boost in performance offered up an extended range for this new C.X, and the system would be fielded in the Front from the summer of 1917 onwards.

As with its predecessors, the C.X biplane sat two crewmembers back-to-back in the cockpit area. The pilot was positioned at front, offering up a traditional field of view under and behind the top wing system and behind the engine. An observer/rear gunner manned a ring-mounted array of 7.5mm Parabellum machine guns and was offered up a great field of fire from this position. Additional stores in the way of light bombs could also be carried.

As successful as the C.X was in the reconnaissance role, the system was replaced with the ultimate C-series aircraft in the form of the C.XII. The addition of this new variant would ensure that the C-series as a whole would be present throughout the final years of the war, ending in 1918.
Any available statistics for the Albatros C.X Biplane Reconnaissance Aircraft are showcased in the areas immediately below. Categories include basic specifications covering country-of-origin, operational status, manufacture(s) and total quantitative production. Other qualities showcased are related to structural values (namely dimensions), installed power and standard day performance figures, installed or proposed armament and mission equipment (if any), global users (from A-to-Z) and series model variants (if any).
Albatros C.X Specifications
National Flag Graphic
Imperial Germany
Year: 1917
Type: Biplane Reconnaissance Aircraft
Manufacturer(s): Albatros Flugzeugwerke - Germany
Production: 0
Supported Mission Types
Ground Attack
Close-Air Support
Airborne Early Warning
Electronic Warfare
Aerial Tanker
Passenger Industry
VIP Travel
Business Travel
Special Forces
Crew: 2
Length: 30.02 ft (9.15 m)
Width: 47.11 ft (14.36 m)
Height: 11.15 ft (3.40 m)
Empty Weight: 3,677 lb (1,668 kg)

Installed Power
1 x Mercedes D.IVa 6-cylinder liquid-cooled inline engine.

Standard Day Performance
Maximum Speed: 109 mph (175 kph; 94 kts)
Service Ceiling: 16,404 ft (5,000 m; 3.11 mi)

2 x 7.5mm Parabellum machine guns in ring-mounted rear cockpit position.

Operators List
Imperial Germany

Series Model Variants
• C.I - Initial C-series model; based on the B.II unarmed reconnaissance biplane; 1 x 7.5mm machine gun in rear gunner position; Mercedes D.III engine delivering 160hp.
• C.III - Derived from the B.III reconaaissance biplane; 1 or 2 x 7.5mm machine guns in rear gunner position; Mercedes D.III engine delivering 160hp.
• C.V - Developed from the C.III; 2 x 7.5mm machine guns in rear gunner position; Mercedes D.IV 8-cylinder engine delivering 220hp; refined fuselage design.
• C.VII - Replacement Model beginning in mid-1916 for the underperforming C.V model.
• C.X - Improved over the C.V design; fitted with Mercedes D.IVa engine delivering 260hp; refined fuselage design.
• C.XII - Regarded as best of te C-series; in service through the end of the war; refined fuselage design.