Military Factory logo
Icon of a dollar sign
Icon of military officer saluting
Icon of F-15 Eagle military combat fighter aircraft
Icon of Abrams Main Battle Tank
Icon of AK-47 assault rifle
Icon of navy warships

Supermarine Attacker

Single-Seat / Single-Engine Navy Fighter Aircraft

Supermarine Attacker

Single-Seat / Single-Engine Navy Fighter Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Supermarine Attacker was the first jet-powered fighter used by the British Royal Navy aircraft carrier groups.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United Kingdom
YEAR: 1951
STATUS: Retired, Out-of-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Supermarine - UK
PRODUCTION: 96
OPERATORS: United Kingdom; Pakistan
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Supermarine Attacker model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 37.47 feet (11.42 meters)
WIDTH: 36.91 feet (11.25 meters)
HEIGHT: 9.91 feet (3.02 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 8,435 pounds (3,826 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 12,211 pounds (5,539 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Rolls-Royce Nene 3 turbojet engine developing 5,000lb of thrust.
SPEED (MAX): 590 miles-per-hour (950 kilometers-per-hour; 513 knots)
RANGE: 590 miles (950 kilometers; 513 nautical miles)
CEILING: 44,997 feet (13,715 meters; 8.52 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 6,350 feet-per-minute (1,935 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



Fighter Variant:
4 x 20mm Hispano No.3 Mark 5 cannons

Fighter-Bomber Variant:
4 x 20mm Hispano No.3 Mark 5 cannons in wing leading edges.
2 x conventional drop bombs underwing
Air-to-surface, unguided rockets underwing
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Type 392 - Prototype Land-Based Fighter for Royal Air Force; single example produced.
• Type 398 - Initial Naval Prototype Model
• Type 513 - Second Naval Prototype Model
• Attacker F.Mk 1 - Fighter Variant
• Attacker FB.Mk 1 - Fighter-Bomber Variant developed from dedicated fighter; provisions for rocket and bomb armament.
• Attacker FB.Mk 2 - Modernized Fighter-Bomber Variant; fitted with Nene 102 series engine; 84 examples produced.
• Type 538 Attacker - Pakistani Export Model; land-based version of the Nene 4-powered Attacker; 36 examples delivered beginning in 1953.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Supermarine Attacker Single-Seat / Single-Engine Navy Fighter Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 6/21/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Supermarine Attacker was a solid, if unspectacular, aircraft that failed to make much of a splash as a jet fighter in the post-World War 2 days. Its primary user became the British Royal Navy though several examples (at least 36) were delivered to Pakistan - the latter using them as land-based interceptors despite the Attacker's carrier pedigree. The system was initially designed for the Royal Air Force to take advantage of an already-existing piston engine fighter airframe (in the form of the Spiteful) and married to the successful Rolls-Royce Nene 3 series turbojet powerplant.

After an unusually long development time (development began as early as 1946 but the system was not fielded until 1951), the RAF version was accepted into operational service with average results. The Royal Navy, however, took an interest in the Supermarine product and began arming their Fleet Air Arm (FAA) with the new Attacker as a carrier-based jet fighter. The Attacker would become the first jet-powered aircraft to be brought aboard British naval carriers.

Once on the ships, the Attacker performed solidly though without much fame. The system would provide the British Royal Navy with a stepping stone to more advanced turbojet-powered alternatives in years to come for the Attacker was eventually weeded out from frontline carrier service as soon as 1954.

The Supermarine Attacker was a single engine jet fighter of ordinary design. The base model of the Spiteful piston aircraft shown through in its design as the aircraft sat with a noticeable "nose-up" appearance when at rest - a throwback to the days of the World War 2 "tail draggers" - this despite the use of a tricycle undercarriage. This nose-up attitude forced the aircraft to rest on a forth, albeit smaller, landing gear system at rear. The pilot sat high and forward on the fuselage with intakes to either side of the cockpit. The twin intakes aspirated the single turbojet engine buried deep within the fuselage center. A single vertical tail fin was mounted atop the empennage ahead of the engine exhaust ring. Wings were straight-wing assemblies and generally consistent with other early turbojet fighters. The Attacker was adequately armed with a battery of 4 x 20mm Hispano cannons, each mounted in the wing leading edge in pairs (noted in photographs by the extending muzzles).

In all, just 182 examples were produced as well as three prototypes. Ultimately, the Attacker was replaced in British service by the Hawker Sea Hawk and de Havilland Sea Venom.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 750mph
Lo: 375mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (590mph).

    Graph average of 562.5 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Supermarine Attacker's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
96
96

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Graphical image of aircraft aerial rockets
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.