Military Factory logo
Icon of a dollar sign
Icon of military officer saluting
Icon of F-15 Eagle military combat fighter aircraft
Icon of Abrams Main Battle Tank
Icon of AK-47 assault rifle
Icon of navy warships

Grumman OV-1 Mohawk

Battlefield Surveillance Aircraft

Grumman OV-1 Mohawk

Battlefield Surveillance Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Grumman OV-1 Mohawk series saw extensive action in the Vietnam War.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1959
MANUFACTURER(S): Grumman - USA
PRODUCTION: 375
OPERATORS: Argentina; Germany; Israel; South Korea; United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Grumman OV-1D Mohawk model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 41.01 feet (12.5 meters)
WIDTH: 48.00 feet (14.63 meters)
HEIGHT: 12.66 feet (3.86 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 11,067 pounds (5,020 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 19,229 pounds (8,722 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Lycoming T35-L-701 turboprop engines developing 1,400 horsepower each.
SPEED (MAX): 297 miles-per-hour (478 kilometers-per-hour; 258 knots)
RANGE: 1,678 miles (2,700 kilometers; 1,458 nautical miles)
CEILING: 35,007 feet (10,670 meters; 6.63 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 2,350 feet-per-minute (716 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



None as standard. Provision for rocket pods and gunpods on two underwing hardpoints.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• G-134 - Grumman Program Model Design Designation; 9 evaluation examples produced.
• YAO-1 (YOV-1A) - Initial Evaluation Aircraft Designation; later redesignated to YOV-1.
• OV-1A (AO-1AF) - Initial Production Model Designation for US Army usage; day/night visual reconnaissance; conventional camera systems.
• JOV-1A - Armed OV-1A and OV-1C models; 169 examples produced.
• OV-1B (AO-1BF) - Production Model Designation for US Army usage; SLAR (Side-Looking Airborne Radar) suite carried in large under-underfuselage pod; sans optical cameras.
• OV-1C (AO-1CF) - Based on the OV-1B but fitted with an AAS-24 infrared surveillance system.
• OV-1D - Definitive Mohawk; improved engine performance; side-loading cargo door; IR, SLAR and optical sensors; B and C models converted to this standard; 37 new-build units with 82 conversions.
• RV-1C "Quick Look" ELINT - Dedicated Electronic Surveillance Platform; 2 conversions.
• RV-1D "Quick Look II" ELINT - Dedicated Electronic Surveillance Platform; 31 converions.
• EV-1D "Quick Look III" ELINT
• OV-1E - Proposed Modernized Mohawk Prototype; never produced; single example.
• OF-1 - Reserved USMC Designation (USMC pulled out of the OV-1 program).


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Grumman OV-1 Mohawk Battlefield Surveillance Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 1/19/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
Development of the OV-1 Mohawk platform stemmed from a joint requirement fielded by both the United States Army and the United States Marine Corps for a "battlefield surveillance aircraft" displaying rugged and versatile qualities on an ever-changing front. Grumman's the twin engine G-134 model proved heartily enough with both branches of service proceeding on the elected design. Though the United States Marine Corps would eventually pull out of the program, the US Army continued on and would field the system to good effect from the Vietnam War all the way through to Operation Desert Storm. The strengths of the system lay in its STOL (Short Take-Off and Landing) performance and ability to carry an array of sophisticated sensors and camera equipment.

The Mohawk fielded two Lycoming turboprop engines, each developing 1,005 horsepower and mounted on a midset-wing monoplane assembly. A highly-identifiable feature of the series was the three-fin tail structure. A crew of two sat side-by-side in an armored cockpit complete with bullet-proof glass. The cockpit offered up outstanding visibility forward, side, up and even downwards to some extent thanks in part to the bulging side windows. Armament was not standard in traditional models though the system was prepared to mount rocket and gun pods as needed on the two underwing hardpoints (one per wing).

The G-134 evolved into nine evaluation models known as the YAO-1 and, later, the YOV-1 series. Initial production models were ordered for the US Army as the OV-1A and centered around day and night visual reconnaissance centering on conventional camera systems. The OV-1B followed soon after, offering up a different suite of radar in the SLAR (Side-Looking Airborne Radar) which were mounted in an notieceable large under-fuselage pod, though this platform was fielded without the optical cameras of the preceding model. The similar OV-1C was next up, fitted with an AAS-24 infrared surveillance system while the definitive OV-1 proved to be the OV-1D featuring improved engine specifications, a side-loading bay door for minimal cargo and additional sensors found in other previous individual models. Previous "B" and "C" models were later brought up to this ultimate standard. Deliveries of some 375 Mohawks continued from 1961 through 1970.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 300mph
Lo: 150mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (297mph).

    Graph average of 225 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Grumman OV-1D Mohawk's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
375
375

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.