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Euler D.I

Biplane Fighting Scout Aircraft

OVERVIEW
HISTORY
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
DATA
Overview



The Euler D.I represented a World War I-era German Empire copy of the Allied Nieuport 11 biplane fighter.
History



Detailing the development and operational history of the Euler D.I Biplane Fighting Scout Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 7/31/2019. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
During the air war of World War 1 (1914-1918), Euler-Werke of the German Empire was one of several concerns given the task of designing a "fighting scout" in the image of the excellent French-made Nieuport 11 "Bebe" biplane fighter to serve German purposes in the conflict. The Bebe first appeared in January of 1916 and proved hugely instrumental in ending the reign of the German Fokkers - the period of dominance known as the "Fokker Scourge" which spanned from August of 1915 until early-1916.

The same biplane-winged, single-seat, single-engine configuration was adopted to produce the Euler D.I. V-shaped struts were used to brace the upper and lower wing members and an Oberursel U.O. 7-cylinder rotary engine of 80 horsepower output was selected to drive the two-bladed wooden propeller unit situated at the nose. The pilot sat aft of the engine installation and under/aft the upper wing member in the usual way. A portion of the wing member was cut away to aid viewing the action above the aircraft. The tail utilized a small-area rudder with low-set horizontal planes and the aircraft accomplished ground-running through a traditional tail-dragger arrangement.

As in the Nieuport 11, the D.I carried a single 7.92mm machine gun installed over the engine and synchronized to fire through the spinning propeller blades.

The aircraft could managed a maximum speed of 87 miles-per-hour and reached an altitude of 2,000 meters in just over 12 minutes.

A first-flight in prototype form of the D.I was recorded in the Fall of 1916. That October, German authorities, satisfied with the progress on the D.I, placed an order for some fifty aircraft even before the D.I had been truly tested. A pair of prototypes served as fighter trainers before the end of the year but the aircraft did not undertake the formal requisite trials until January of 1917. Another fifty aircraft were added to the existing order but these were finished to the D.II standard form detailed elsewhere on this site.

The Euler D.I held little impact, if any, on the war.




Specifications

YEAR: 1917
STATUS: Retired, Out-of-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Euler-Werke - German Empire
PRODUCTION: 53
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 19.03 ft (5.8 m)
WIDTH: 26.57 ft (8.1 m)
HEIGHT: 8.69 ft (2.65 m)
EMPTY WEIGHT: 838 lb (380 kg)
MTOW: 1,323 lb (600 kg)
POWER: 1 x Oberursel U.O. 7-cylinder rotary piston engine developing 80 horsepower and driving a two-bladed wooden propeller at the nose.
SPEED: 87 mph (140 kph; 76 kts)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 525 ft/min (160 m/min)
OPERATORS: German Empire
Armament



1 x 7.92 machine gun in fixed, forward-firing mounting over the nose synchronized to fire through the spinning propeller blades.
Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Variants / Models



• D.I - Base Series Designation.








Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed
Hi: 100mph
Lo: 50mph
This entry's maximum listed speed (87mph).

Graph average of 75 miles-per-hour.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production (53)
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
53
53

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.




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